BEGIN:VCALENDAR VERSION:2.0 PRODID:-//Georgetown University - ECPv5.1.6//NONSGML v1.0//EN CALSCALE:GREGORIAN METHOD:PUBLISH X-WR-CALNAME:Georgetown University X-ORIGINAL-URL:https://www.georgetown.edu X-WR-CALDESC:Events for Georgetown University BEGIN:VTIMEZONE TZID:America/New_York BEGIN:DAYLIGHT TZOFFSETFROM:-0500 TZOFFSETTO:-0400 TZNAME:EDT DTSTART:20200308T070000 END:DAYLIGHT BEGIN:STANDARD TZOFFSETFROM:-0400 TZOFFSETTO:-0500 TZNAME:EST DTSTART:20201101T060000 END:STANDARD END:VTIMEZONE BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200831T130000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200831T140000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200612T181818Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200916T144601Z UID:35777-1598878800-1598882400@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Statistical\, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Consultation Services DESCRIPTION:Department of Biostatistics\, Bioinformatics & Biomathematics offers statistical and bioinformatics consulting and collaboration covering a broad range of study design\, statistical analysis and data science issues including experimental design for pre-clinical investigations\, clinical trials\, population studies\, and Big Data analytics (e.g.\, predictive & risk modeling\, statistical analysis of next-generation sequence data and omics data).  We are actively involved in cutting-edge work in cancer research\, neurological disorders\, epidemiological studies\, as well as in statistical and bioinformatics methods research and development projects.  We can collaborate in writing and implementing competitive project proposals involving methodological and software development. \nOne-Hour Complimentary Consultation (GU only)\nA free complimentary consultation (up to 60 minutes) is available to members of the GU community by appointment\, every Monday 1pm – 2pm.  Appointments can be used to address general statistical questions on data or analysis issues in a research study project\, etc.  Service is limited to one appointment per person/group per semester.  Please be advised that work beyond one-hour will incur a fee. \nTo request a complimentary consultation\, email dbbb@georgetown.edu and include: \n\nEmail Subject: “Complimentary Consultation”\nContact Information (e.g. name\, email & phone)\nWorking Title & Brief Description (e.g. one paragraph) \nType of Assistance Requested\nStage of the Project (e.g. planning\, design\, data collection\, etc.)\n\nMore information URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/statistical-biostatistics-and-bioinformatics-consultation/2020-08-31/ LOCATION:Online CATEGORIES:Research ORGANIZER;CN="Department%20of%20Biostatistics":MAILTO:dbbb@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200901T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200901T170000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200817T030037Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200821T181052Z UID:36228-1598976000-1598979600@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Toward a Post-Nuclear Just Peace DESCRIPTION:On November 10\, 2017\, Pope Francis became the first pontiff to ban nuclear weapons outright\, even for the purpose of deterrence. At a Vatican conference of leaders in the field of disarmament\, he made it clear that the possession of the bomb itself was immoral. The Catholic Church’s advocacy of nuclear abolition presents an opportunity for global leaders to connect disarmament to larger movements for peace\, pointing toward future action. In a similar development including voices from violent conflict zones and Vatican conferences in 2016 and 2019\, the just peace ethic provides a crucial framework for considering how we might proceed on this issue and other intense conflicts. Recognizing that all life is sacred and seeking peace through violence is an untenable position. Just peace is an important framework for considering how we might pursue a nonnuclear peace. It turns our attention to creative strategies of active nonviolence embedded in the characters of the practitioners. \nIn this conversation\, Rev. Drew Christiansen\, S.J.\, co-editor of A World Free From Nuclear Weapons (2020)\, and Eli McCarthy\, editor of A Just Peace Ethic Primer (2020)\, will discuss the implications of the Pope’s stance on nuclear disarmament and how a just peace might be pursued more faithfully\, consistently\, and effectively. Topics will include the Treaty to Prohibit Nuclear Weapons\, the challenges of the new nuclear age\, the three categories of a just peace ethic and a case example\, and the agenda for both theoretical inquiry and programs of social action in pursuit of a post-nuclear peace. \nThis event is co-sponsored by the Berkley Center for Religion\, Peace\, and World Affairs and Georgetown University Press. \nThe Zoom Webinar link and instructions to join the call will be sent via email at 12:00 p.m. EDT on September 1 to anyone who has filled out the RSVP form. This event will be recorded and posted to the event page after the event date. Please RSVP to receive an email notification once it is posted. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/toward-a-post-nuclear-just-peace/ LOCATION:Online via Zoom Webinar CATEGORIES:Academic Events,Religious/Spiritual,Special Events END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200902T173000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200902T183000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200824T215655Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200826T190756Z UID:37156-1599067800-1599071400@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Why (and How) Campaign Narratives Stick DESCRIPTION:In this era of constant push notifications and rapid-fire news cycles\, news stories that would have once dominated several days of news coverage\, now sometimes fail to even register a blip on the radar screen. Using the recently-published Words That Matter as a backdrop\, authors Jonathan Ladd and Josh Pasek discuss their research on why and how certain campaign narratives are formed\, are circulated\, and how and what sticks. Ladd and Pasek will present their findings from the 2016 election and\, in conversation with top campaign operatives\, will discuss what to look out for in 2020. Will President Trump and Republicans be able to reuse their old playbook\, or is Vice President Biden uniquely immune from some of the attacks that sank Sec. Clinton? Join us for this exciting discussion\, moderated by NBC News’ Rebecca Sinderbrand (C ’99)\, on the role social media and campaigns play in setting and crafting electoral narratives. \nThis event will be live-streamed on GU Politics’ social media platforms (Twitter\, Facebook\, and YouTube). Current Georgetown students\, staff\, and faculty may register here to receive a Zoom link: https://forms.gle/WmVNsM67o5n1ix8K8 URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/why-and-how-campaign-narratives-stick/ LOCATION:Online\, Online\, US END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200907T130000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200907T140000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200612T181818Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200916T144602Z UID:35778-1599483600-1599487200@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Statistical\, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Consultation Services DESCRIPTION:Department of Biostatistics\, Bioinformatics & Biomathematics offers statistical and bioinformatics consulting and collaboration covering a broad range of study design\, statistical analysis and data science issues including experimental design for pre-clinical investigations\, clinical trials\, population studies\, and Big Data analytics (e.g.\, predictive & risk modeling\, statistical analysis of next-generation sequence data and omics data).  We are actively involved in cutting-edge work in cancer research\, neurological disorders\, epidemiological studies\, as well as in statistical and bioinformatics methods research and development projects.  We can collaborate in writing and implementing competitive project proposals involving methodological and software development. \nOne-Hour Complimentary Consultation (GU only)\nA free complimentary consultation (up to 60 minutes) is available to members of the GU community by appointment\, every Monday 1pm – 2pm.  Appointments can be used to address general statistical questions on data or analysis issues in a research study project\, etc.  Service is limited to one appointment per person/group per semester.  Please be advised that work beyond one-hour will incur a fee. \nTo request a complimentary consultation\, email dbbb@georgetown.edu and include: \n\nEmail Subject: “Complimentary Consultation”\nContact Information (e.g. name\, email & phone)\nWorking Title & Brief Description (e.g. one paragraph) \nType of Assistance Requested\nStage of the Project (e.g. planning\, design\, data collection\, etc.)\n\nMore information URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/statistical-biostatistics-and-bioinformatics-consultation/2020-09-07/ LOCATION:Online CATEGORIES:Research ORGANIZER;CN="Department%20of%20Biostatistics":MAILTO:dbbb@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200907T140000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200907T160000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200907T163945Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200921T173448Z UID:38671-1599487200-1599494400@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Decolonizing Global Health Seminar Series DESCRIPTION:Please join the Science\, Technology and International Affairs Program (STIA) and the Center for Global Health Science and Security (GHSS) for a new seminar series on Decolonizing Global Health. This series is offered in conjunction with a new 1-credit course in the STIA program\, STIA 408\, led by Professors Claire Standley and Emily Mendenhall. The talks take place on select Thursdays at 2pm and are open to the Georgetown community. \nThe concept of “decolonialization” of academic curricula and research partnerships has gained momentum in recent years\, stemming from frustrations at the implicit and explicit ways in which Western cultural\, political\, and educational hegemony pervade virtually all disciplines. In global health\, false narratives of objectivity\, universality\, and apolitical interests cloud the realities of historical roots in European and North American colonial endeavors. \nWant to learn more? Georgetown students can RSVP here to join the Zoom room for individual lectures – please see the links below. Those students who succesfully RSVP for the event will receive a google calendar invite with the Zoom meeting link. \nNot a Georgetown student? You can watch the sessions streamed live over YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/c/DecolonizingGlobalHealth and submit questions in the comments! \n**Please note that registration for any of the individual seminars indicates your consent to have your video and audio live streamed to the “Decolonizing Global Health” YouTube channel\, as well as recorded for later public posting. \n  \nSeminar Schedule \nAugust 26 – Global Health Research Needs a Makeover \nProfessor Madhukar Pai\, Canada Research Chair in Epidemiology & Global Health\, McGill University & Director\, McGill International TB Centre \n  \nSeptember 7* – The Colonial Legacy: Re-thinking Health Equity in the Global South \nDr. Maria Amelia Viteri (University of Maryland\, USA & Universidad San Francisco de Quito\, Ecuador) \n*Note that this session occurs on a Monday \n  \nSeptember 17 – Global health\, Development\, and Colonialism \nDr. Lucy Gilson (University of Cape Town\, South Africa) and Dr. Mosa Moshabela (University of KwaZulu-Natal\, South Africa) \n  \nSeptember 24 – Indigenous knowledge in public health \nDr. Eli Nelson (Williams College\, USA) \nAssistant Professor\, American Studies and Science and Technology Studies Programs \nMedicine has an especially capacious definition in Indigenous contexts\, touching on topics and relationships in the realms of religion\, governance\, diplomacy\, environmental sciences\, and more. Indigenous doctors and public health authorities have long argued that decolonizing or reforming public health requires a holistic approach that can be incommensurable with settler and other colonial modes of risk assessment\, care\, and future planning. In this lecture\, I will provide a broad historical and contemporary view of Indigenous medicine and public health on Turtle Island\, focusing on the roles it has played in Indigenous assertions of sovereignty\, land\, spirit\, and futurity. We will start with a review of how Indigenous medicine and knowledge was deployed in epidemics in the 17th century\, followed by reservation medicine during the Red Progressive era\, Indigenous feminist public health movements in the 20th century\, and concluding with a note on how Native science and medicine produces community care and protection amidst climate change and Covid-19 crises. \n  \nOctober 1 – Health equity and reform (Time TBD) \nDr. Devaki Nambiar (The George Institute for Global Health\, India) \n  \nOctober 8 – Increasing research equity and autonomy \nDr. Ngozi Erondu (Chatham House\, UK & Project Zambezi\, Zimbabwe) \n  \nOctober 15 – Effecting change in academia / Colonial legacies in mental health \nDr. Anouska Bhattacharyya (YW Boston\, USA) \n  \nWeek of October 19: Capstone Panel (Date/Time TBD) \nDr. Akiiki Bitalabeho\, Dr. Zahirah McNatt (University of Global Health Equity\, Rwanda & Partners in Health | Inshuti Mu Buzima\, Rwanda) URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/decolonizing-global-health-seminar-series/2020-09-07/ LOCATION:Remote Online\, Remote Online\, US CATEGORIES:Academic Events ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://www.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/https-_cdn.evbuc_.com_images_110414363_110057598857_1_original.20200903-201623-e1599496376995.jpg ORGANIZER;CN="Obdulio%20Moronta":MAILTO:om111@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200908T100000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200908T110000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200904T203834Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200907T201532Z UID:38563-1599559200-1599562800@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Power on the Precipice DESCRIPTION:Will the United States maintain its leadership in an increasingly unpredictable environment? In Power on the Precipice\, former adviser to Secretary of State John Kerry and CSET senior fellow Andrew Imbrie lays out a roadmap for bolstering American leadership in an era of turbulence abroad and deepening polarization at home. This map can help U.S. leaders navigate the lessons of the past\, learn about tough policy trade-offs and forge a new future for this country. Drawing on his experience as an adviser to former Secretary of State John Kerry\, interviews with key leaders\, and comparative studies of the rise and fall of nations\, he argues that the United States must adapt to changing global dynamics and compete more wisely. \nFormer Deputy National Security Advisor Avril Haines will lead an illuminating discussion with Dr. Imbrie at this live event before turning to audience questions. You can register to join the webinar here or follow along at CSET Live. Join us! \nParticipants\nDr. Andrew Imbrie is a Senior Fellow at Georgetown’s Center for Security and Emerging Technology (CSET). He previously worked as a fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and as a senior advisor to Visiting Distinguished Statesman Secretary John F. Kerry. Prior to Carnegie\, he served as a member of the Policy Planning Staff at the State Department\, where he was a speechwriter to Secretary Kerry. Before moving to the Department of State\, he served as a professional staff member on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. He teaches foreign policy speechwriting and rhetoric to graduate and undergraduate students at Georgetown University. He received his B.A. in the Humanities from Connecticut College and an M.A. from the Walsh School of Foreign Service. He holds a Ph.D. in International Relations from Georgetown University. \nAvril Haines served as Assistant to the President and Principal Deputy National Security Advisor to President Obama and as Deputy Director of the Central Intelligence Agency. Avril also held a number of senior legal positions in the government\, including Legal Adviser to the National Security Council and Assistant Legal Adviser for Treaty Affairs. Avril received her bachelor’s degree in Physics from the University of Chicago and a law degree from Georgetown University Law Center. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/power-on-the-precipice/ LOCATION:Online\, Online\, US ORGANIZER;CN="The%20Center%20for%20Security%20and%20Emerging%20Technology":MAILTO:cset@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200908T130000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200908T150000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200901T171252Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200902T143040Z UID:38081-1599570000-1599577200@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Dissertation Defense: Chrystie Swiney DESCRIPTION:Candidate Name: Chrystie Swiney \nMajor: Government \nAdvisor: Anthony Arend\, Ph.D. \nTitle: The Associational Counter-Revolution: The Spread of Restrictive Civil Society Laws in the World’s Strongest Democratic States \nIn recent years\, an increasing number of democratic states\, including fully consolidated\, long-standing democratic states\, have adopted laws that impose new restrictions on the ability of civil society organizations (CSOs) to operate autonomous from government control. This phenomenon is unsurprising in authoritarian contexts\, but perplexing in democratic ones. This dissertation explores this concerning global trend\, which is referred to as the associational counter-revolution or the closing space trend\, which began in earnest at the turn of the 21st century and has been gaining momentum and intensity ever since. \nThis dissertation argues that the world’s strongest democratic states\, like so many of the world’s states\, are restricting the autonomy of their civil society sectors through the passage of restrictive CSO laws because they feel that their national sovereignty is increasingly under threat by the rise of non-states actors\, including CSOs. This perception gradually emerged during CSOs’ so-called ‘golden age’ in the 1990s\, when their numbers\, popularity\, and funding soared\, and when they became increasingly involved in both national and international politics. Individual CSOs coalesced with other CSOs across state borders to form large-scale transnational advocacy networks (TANs)\, and together they acquired new tools and strategies\, such as the “boomerang\,” to leapfrog over their national governments to advance their own agendas. \nStates\, recognizing the rising influence and assertiveness of CSOs\, began pushing back\, roughly around 2005\, in an attempt to re-balance the scales of global and national power in their decisive favor. One way in which they have done this\, particularly among the world’s strongest democratic states\, is through the passage of restrictive CSO laws. These laws stigmatize CSOs as malicious actors intent on undermining the state’s interests and sovereignty\, while narrowing their scope of autonomy and independence. \nThis interdisciplinary dissertation uses a variety of methods from both legal scholarship and the field of international relations\, including comparative legal analysis\, case studies\, and trend analysis\, to empirically document the spread of restrictive CSO laws in the world’s strongest democratic states from 1990-2018. Given that an independent civil society is critical to a well-functioning democracy\, the findings of this dissertation have profound implications for global democracy as well as the future of international relations. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/dissertation-defense-chrystie-swiney/ LOCATION:Virtual\, Virtual\, US CATEGORIES:Dissertation Defense END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200908T170000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200908T180000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200907T135833Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200907T135833Z UID:38607-1599584400-1599588000@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Workers and an Equitable COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution DESCRIPTION:As part of an ongoing series of conversations on the impact of COVID-19 on workers and working families\, this Tuesday\, September 8 at 5pm EDT\, a partnership of Georgetown offices\, including the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor\, the Georgetown Global Health Initiative\, and the School of Nursing and Health Studies will host a conversation on the equitable distribution of a COVID-19 vaccine and how unions and workers can respond to developing plans for a vaccine’s distribution. The conversation will feature initial comments followed by time for questions and dialogue. Speakers will include:\nDavid Michaels\, Professor\, Milken Institute School of Public Health of George Washington University and member of the National Academies’ Committee on a Framework for Equitable Allocation of Vaccine for the Novel Coronavirus.\nLiz Royal\, Coordinator\, SEIU National Nurse Alliance\nRobyn Robbins\, Director of Occupational Safety and Health at UFCW will discuss the role of organized labor in these conversations joined by\nPlease join us for this important conversation and share the invitation within your networks. You can reach out to Lily at lily.ryan@georgetown.edu with questions or to join an ongoing listserv for this call. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/workers-and-an-equitable-covid-19-vaccine-distribution/ LOCATION:Virtual\, Virtual\, US CATEGORIES:Social Justice ORGANIZER;CN="Lily%20Ryan":MAILTO:lily.ryan@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200910T100000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200910T113000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200814T220747Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200908T192629Z UID:36200-1599732000-1599737400@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Dueling Pandemics: Faith\, HIV\, and COVID-19 DESCRIPTION:Religious communities and faith-inspired organizations have always been part of the global response to devastating outbreaks of infectious diseases\, playing vital roles that draw on their distinct capabilities. But how should these entities respond when battling two pandemics at once\, especially when it seems like the response to one may interfere with the response to the other? The HIV/AIDS pandemic is now 40 years old. The world has made remarkable progress and continues to work toward ending it within the next decade. Meanwhile\, the COVID-19 pandemic has struck with blinding speed\, threatening to reverse that progress. \nThe webinar will explore challenges and hope\, first engaging a proposed strategy that is the product of broad-based reflection launched in September 2019 at the Berkley Center as a challenge to faith communities\, and then taking stock of the impact of the COVID-19 emergency. The discussion will focus on two issues: Given the realities of the COVID-19 pandemic\, how should the religious response to HIV change so that progress towards ending the HIV pandemic by 2030 is sustained? What are the most effective strategies for religious communities to battle HIV and COVID-19 at the same time? \nThe Zoom Webinar link and instructions to join the call will be sent via email at 8:00 a.m. EDT on September 10 to anyone who has filled out the RSVP form. This event will be recorded and posted to the event page after the event date. Please RSVP to receive an email notification once it is posted. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/dueling-pandemics-faith-hiv-and-covid-19/ LOCATION:Online via Zoom Webinar CATEGORIES:Community,Religious/Spiritual,Special Events END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200910T140000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200910T160000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200907T163945Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200921T173448Z UID:40824-1599746400-1599753600@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Decolonizing Global Health Seminar Series DESCRIPTION:Please join the Science\, Technology and International Affairs Program (STIA) and the Center for Global Health Science and Security (GHSS) for a new seminar series on Decolonizing Global Health. This series is offered in conjunction with a new 1-credit course in the STIA program\, STIA 408\, led by Professors Claire Standley and Emily Mendenhall. The talks take place on select Thursdays at 2pm and are open to the Georgetown community. \nThe concept of “decolonialization” of academic curricula and research partnerships has gained momentum in recent years\, stemming from frustrations at the implicit and explicit ways in which Western cultural\, political\, and educational hegemony pervade virtually all disciplines. In global health\, false narratives of objectivity\, universality\, and apolitical interests cloud the realities of historical roots in European and North American colonial endeavors. \nWant to learn more? Georgetown students can RSVP here to join the Zoom room for individual lectures – please see the links below. Those students who succesfully RSVP for the event will receive a google calendar invite with the Zoom meeting link. \nNot a Georgetown student? You can watch the sessions streamed live over YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/c/DecolonizingGlobalHealth and submit questions in the comments! \n**Please note that registration for any of the individual seminars indicates your consent to have your video and audio live streamed to the “Decolonizing Global Health” YouTube channel\, as well as recorded for later public posting. \n  \nSeminar Schedule \nAugust 26 – Global Health Research Needs a Makeover \nProfessor Madhukar Pai\, Canada Research Chair in Epidemiology & Global Health\, McGill University & Director\, McGill International TB Centre \n  \nSeptember 7* – The Colonial Legacy: Re-thinking Health Equity in the Global South \nDr. Maria Amelia Viteri (University of Maryland\, USA & Universidad San Francisco de Quito\, Ecuador) \n*Note that this session occurs on a Monday \n  \nSeptember 17 – Global health\, Development\, and Colonialism \nDr. Lucy Gilson (University of Cape Town\, South Africa) and Dr. Mosa Moshabela (University of KwaZulu-Natal\, South Africa) \n  \nSeptember 24 – Indigenous knowledge in public health \nDr. Eli Nelson (Williams College\, USA) \nAssistant Professor\, American Studies and Science and Technology Studies Programs \nMedicine has an especially capacious definition in Indigenous contexts\, touching on topics and relationships in the realms of religion\, governance\, diplomacy\, environmental sciences\, and more. Indigenous doctors and public health authorities have long argued that decolonizing or reforming public health requires a holistic approach that can be incommensurable with settler and other colonial modes of risk assessment\, care\, and future planning. In this lecture\, I will provide a broad historical and contemporary view of Indigenous medicine and public health on Turtle Island\, focusing on the roles it has played in Indigenous assertions of sovereignty\, land\, spirit\, and futurity. We will start with a review of how Indigenous medicine and knowledge was deployed in epidemics in the 17th century\, followed by reservation medicine during the Red Progressive era\, Indigenous feminist public health movements in the 20th century\, and concluding with a note on how Native science and medicine produces community care and protection amidst climate change and Covid-19 crises. \n  \nOctober 1 – Health equity and reform (Time TBD) \nDr. Devaki Nambiar (The George Institute for Global Health\, India) \n  \nOctober 8 – Increasing research equity and autonomy \nDr. Ngozi Erondu (Chatham House\, UK & Project Zambezi\, Zimbabwe) \n  \nOctober 15 – Effecting change in academia / Colonial legacies in mental health \nDr. Anouska Bhattacharyya (YW Boston\, USA) \n  \nWeek of October 19: Capstone Panel (Date/Time TBD) \nDr. Akiiki Bitalabeho\, Dr. Zahirah McNatt (University of Global Health Equity\, Rwanda & Partners in Health | Inshuti Mu Buzima\, Rwanda) URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/decolonizing-global-health-seminar-series/2020-09-10/ LOCATION:Remote Online\, Remote Online\, US CATEGORIES:Academic Events ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://www.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/https-_cdn.evbuc_.com_images_110414363_110057598857_1_original.20200903-201623-e1599496376995.jpg ORGANIZER;CN="Obdulio%20Moronta":MAILTO:om111@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200910T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200910T173000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200804T181330Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200820T180424Z UID:35658-1599753600-1599759000@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:GU Politics Open House\, Featuring Fall 2020 Fellows DESCRIPTION:We’re so excited to welcome the Fall 2020 class of GU Politics Fellows to Georgetown! Please save the date for the “GU Politics Open House featuring the Fall 2020 Fellows” at 4:00 – 5:30 p.m. on Thursday\, September 10\, 2020! \nYou won’t want to miss seeing all of our Fellows sharing a virtual stage for the first time in conversation with our Executive Director\, Mo Elleithee. After a conversation and Q&A\, fellows will meet with students in small breakout rooms to continue the conversation. We hope to see you there! \n– Errin Haines: Founding member and Editor at Large\, The 19th\n– Mary Katharine Ham: Author and CNN Commentator\n– Kevin Hassett: Former Senior Advisor and Chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers\, Trump Administration\n– Mia Love: Former Member of Congress (R-UT)\, 2015-2019\n– Faiz Shakir (L ‘06): Campaign Manager\, Bernie Sanders’ 2020 Presidential Campaign\n– Lis Smith: Senior Advisor for Communications\, Pete Buttigieg’s 2020 Presidential Campaign \nPlease RSVP to receive a Zoom link: https://forms.gle/KN8KMds6czR7ebyo9 URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/gu-politics-open-house-featuring-fall-2020-fellows/ LOCATION:Online\, Online\, US END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200911T130000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200911T150000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200824T135612Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200827T135735Z UID:37057-1599829200-1599836400@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Psychology Major/Minor Declaration Session DESCRIPTION:Interested in majoring or minoring in Psychology? \nWondering what is required to be a psychology major or minor? \nYou can get all your questions answered and your declaration form approved at the Psychology Major/Minor Declaration Sessions! \nPlease RSVP to receive Zoom link. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/psychology-major-minor-declaration-session/ LOCATION:Virtual via Zoom\, Virtual via Zoom\, US ORGANIZER;CN="Department%20of%20Psychology":MAILTO:psychology@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200911T140000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200911T150000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200811T030751Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200824T165656Z UID:35908-1599832800-1599836400@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Weaving the Dream: The Legacy of Persian Rugs DESCRIPTION:The Persian Studies program welcomes all to our first event in the 2020-2021 Jalinous Lecture Series\, featuring Persian rug specialist Safoura Zoroofchi in discussing the history and heritage of Persian rugs. \nThis event will take place via Zoom. Please visit the Eventbrite page to register and receive the Zoom link: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/weaving-the-dream-the-legacy-of-persian-rugs-tickets-116103934995?aff=ebdssbonlinesearch \nThis event is funded in part by the Jalinous Endowed Fund for Persian Culture and Language Studies. \nAbout the Designer\, Safoura Zoroofchi\nPersian carpet and crafts specialist \nFounder of Nar Collection\, a design house focusing on high-quality hand-crafted fashion accessories inspired by Persian art and culture. \nSafoura has a BA in Persian Crafts\, specializing in Persian Rugs\, from Al-Zahra University\, Tehran\, MA in Illustration from Tehran University of Art\, and studied textile design at the St. Martin’s School\, University of the Arts\, London. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/weaving-the-dream-the-legacy-of-persian-rugs/ LOCATION:Webinar via Zoom\, Webinar via Zoom\, US CATEGORIES:Lecture,Special Events,Student Events ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://www.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/Horizental-rug.jpg ORGANIZER;CN="Farima%20Mostowfi":MAILTO:persian@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200914T130000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200914T140000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200612T181818Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200916T144604Z UID:35779-1600088400-1600092000@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Statistical\, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Consultation Services DESCRIPTION:Department of Biostatistics\, Bioinformatics & Biomathematics offers statistical and bioinformatics consulting and collaboration covering a broad range of study design\, statistical analysis and data science issues including experimental design for pre-clinical investigations\, clinical trials\, population studies\, and Big Data analytics (e.g.\, predictive & risk modeling\, statistical analysis of next-generation sequence data and omics data).  We are actively involved in cutting-edge work in cancer research\, neurological disorders\, epidemiological studies\, as well as in statistical and bioinformatics methods research and development projects.  We can collaborate in writing and implementing competitive project proposals involving methodological and software development. \nOne-Hour Complimentary Consultation (GU only)\nA free complimentary consultation (up to 60 minutes) is available to members of the GU community by appointment\, every Monday 1pm – 2pm.  Appointments can be used to address general statistical questions on data or analysis issues in a research study project\, etc.  Service is limited to one appointment per person/group per semester.  Please be advised that work beyond one-hour will incur a fee. \nTo request a complimentary consultation\, email dbbb@georgetown.edu and include: \n\nEmail Subject: “Complimentary Consultation”\nContact Information (e.g. name\, email & phone)\nWorking Title & Brief Description (e.g. one paragraph) \nType of Assistance Requested\nStage of the Project (e.g. planning\, design\, data collection\, etc.)\n\nMore information URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/statistical-biostatistics-and-bioinformatics-consultation/2020-09-14/ LOCATION:Online CATEGORIES:Research ORGANIZER;CN="Department%20of%20Biostatistics":MAILTO:dbbb@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200914T130000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200914T143000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200911T183543Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200917T192307Z UID:39315-1600088400-1600093800@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Russian Conversation Hours DESCRIPTION:Russian conversation hour for those learning the language. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/russian-conversation-hours-2/2020-09-14/ LOCATION:RSVP to receive a link to Zoom meeting – russconversations@georgetown.edu\, RSVP to receive a link to Zoom meeting - russconversations@georgetown.edu\, US ORGANIZER;CN="Marina%20Samkharadze":MAILTO:ms2395@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200915T120000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200915T130000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200910T224621Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200911T194103Z UID:38341-1600171200-1600174800@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Neuroscience Seminar Series - Gina Poe\, PhD DESCRIPTION:This seminar is a part of the Department of Neuroscience Seminar Series. \nDr Gina Poe is a Professor in the Integrative Biology & Physiology Department at University of California\, Los Angeles (UCLA) in Los Angeles\, California. \nHost: Kathy Conant\, MD \nTitle: “Sleep features that change your mind” \n  \nBiography\n\nGina Poe has been working since 1995 on the mechanisms through which sleep serves memory consolidation and restructuring. Dr. Poe is a southern California native who graduated from Stanford University then worked for two post-baccalaureate years at the VA researching Air Force Test Pilots’ brainwave signatures under high-G maneuvers. She then earned her PhD in Basic Sleep in the Neuroscience Interdepartmental Program at UCLA under the guidance of Ronald Harper then moved to the University of Arizona for her postdoctoral studies with Carol Barnes and Bruce McNaughtons looking at graceful degradation of hippocampal function in aged rats as well as hippocampal coding in a 3-D maze navigated in the 1998 space shuttle mission. She brought these multiunit teachings to answer a burning question of whether REM sleep were for remembering or forgetting and found that activity of neurons during REM sleep is consistent both with the consolidation of novel memories and the elimination of already consolidated memories from the hippocampus\, readying the associative memory network for new learning the next day. Moving first to Washington State University then to the University of Michigan before joining UCLA in 2016\, Poe has over 80 undergraduates\, 6 graduate students\, and 6 postdoctoral scholars\, and has served in university faculty governance as well as leading 5 different programs designed to diversify the neuroscience workforce and increase representation of people of the global majority in the STEM fields. At UCLA she continues research and teaching and Directs the COMPASS-Life Sciences and BRI-SURE programs and co-Directs the MARC-U*STAR program. Nationally she is course director of the Marine Biological Lab’s SPINES course and co-Directs the Society for Neuroscience’s NSP program which earned the nation’s highest mentoring honor in 2018. These programs have served over 600 PhD level trainees over the years. \n\n  \nResearch Interests\n\nThe Poe lab investigates the mechanisms by which sleep traits serve learning and memory consolidation. Memories are encoded by the pattern of synaptic connections between neurons. We employ tetrode recording and optogenetic techniques in learning animals to see how neural patterns underlying learning are reactivated during sleep\, and how activity during sleep influences the neural memory code. Both strengthening and weakening of synapses is important to the process of sculpting a network when we make new memories and integrate them into old schema. Results from our studies suggest that while synaptic strengthening can be efficiently accomplished during the waking learning process\, the synaptic weakening part of memory integration requires conditions unique to sleep. The absence of noradrenaline during sleep spindles and REM sleep as well as the low levels of serotonin during REM sleep allow the brain to integrate new memories and to refresh and renew old synapses so that we are ready to build new associations the next waking period. Memory difficulties involved in post-traumatic stress disorder\, Schizophrenia\, Alzheimer’s disease and even autism involve abnormalities in the sleep-dependent memory consolidation process that my lab studies. Keywords: Sleep\, learning and memory\, PTSD\, memory consolidation\, reconsolidation\, REM sleep\, sleep spindles\, Norepinephrine\, LTP\, depotentiation\, reversal learning\, optogenetics\, electrophysiology\, tetrode recordings\, hippocampus\, prefrontal cortex. \n\n  \nEducation\nB.A.\, Human Biology\, Stanford University 1987\nPh.D.\, Neuroscience\, University of California\, Los Angeles 1995 URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/neuroscience-seminar-series-gina-poe-phd/ LOCATION:Zoom Conference\, Zoom Conference\, US CATEGORIES:Special Events,Student Events ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/png:https://www.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/Neuroscience-Seminar-Series_calendar-header-01.png ORGANIZER;CN="Jensue%20Ferrell":MAILTO:jensue.ferrell@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200915T130000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200915T140000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200903T201522Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200909T155739Z UID:38483-1600174800-1600178400@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:The Story of Faith and Black Power in Cairo\, Illinois DESCRIPTION:In Faith in Black Power: Religion\, Race and Resistance in Cairo\, Illinois (2017)\, Dr. Kerry Pimblott uses racial unrest in Cairo as a backdrop for a book that contributes to and complicates the history of the Black freedom struggle in America\, illuminating the relationship between Black churches and Black politics. Pimblott is a lecturer in international history at the University of Manchester whose work and publications address anti-racism\, social movements\, and the African diaspora experience. \nIn this conversation with Berkley Center Director Shaun Casey\, Dr. Pimblott will explore the themes of her book and the history of the civil rights movement through the story of Cairo\, Illinois. Casey and Pimblott will begin by discussing the late Congressman John Lewis’s time in Cairo\, Illinois\, in the summer of 1962. They will then discuss 19-year-old Robert Hunt\, who was found dead in the Cairo police station in 1969 and the civil unrest that incident sparked\, including the mobilization of the United Front\, a black power organization founded and led by Reverend Charles Koen. Casey and Pimblott will consider the ways in which black churches supported and shaped the United Front\, as well as the impact of female leaders on the organization and their influence on young activists. \nThe Zoom Webinar link and instructions to join the call will be sent via email at 10:00 a.m. EDT on September 15 to anyone who has filled out the RSVP form. \nThis event will be recorded and a captioned video will be posted to the event page after the event date. Please RSVP to receive an email notification once it is posted. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/the-story-of-faith-and-black-power-in-cairo-illinois/ LOCATION:Online via Zoom Webinar CATEGORIES:Academic Events,Community,Racial Justice,Religious/Spiritual,Special Events END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200916T130000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200916T143000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200911T183543Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200911T183543Z UID:40839-1600261200-1600266600@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Russian Conversation Hours DESCRIPTION:Russian conversation hour for those learning the language. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/russian-conversation-hours-2/2020-09-16/ LOCATION:RSVP to receive a link to Zoom meeting – russconversations@georgetown.edu\, RSVP to receive a link to Zoom meeting - russconversations@georgetown.edu\, US ORGANIZER;CN="Marina%20Samkharadze":MAILTO:ms2395@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200916T170000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200916T180000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200814T221529Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200916T162344Z UID:36215-1600275600-1600279200@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:The Ethics and Politics of Guantánamo Bay DESCRIPTION:Guantánamo Bay detention camp\, a United States military prison\, has a fraught moral\, legal\, and political history–a history that Carol Rosenberg has covered since its establishment in 2002 by then-President George W. Bush as part of the War on Terror. Current and former detainees have reported abuse\, torture\, and detainment without fair trial\, leading many human rights organizations to advocate for the camp to be closed on moral and legal grounds. Former President Barack Obama made closure of Guantánamo Bay a campaign promise in 2008\, but his administration met significant bipartisan political opposition and was ultimately unsuccessful. President Donald Trump\, by contrast\, signed an executive order in January 2018 to keep the camp open indefinitely. \nCarol Rosenberg is the world’s only full-time Guantánamo Bay reporter. She began reporting on the detention camp in January 2002 and was there when the first prisoners arrived. In this conversation\, she will be joined by John Kirby\, a military and diplomatic analyst for CNN and retired rear admiral in the United States Navy who served as Pentagon press secretary and then as spokesperson for the United States Department of State from 2015 to 2017. Together they will engage on a range of topics\, particularly the moral challenges of Guantánamo Bay\, the barriers to closing\, and the political costs to keeping it open. The conversation will be set within the context of the lead-up to the 2020 election and the opposing platforms of the two candidates on the topic. Berkley Center Managing Director Michael Kessler will provide an introduction and Karen J. Greenberg\, director of the Center on National Security at Fordham University\, will moderate the discussion. \nThis event is part of the Berkley Center for Religion\, Peace\, and World Affairs collaboration with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. \nThe Zoom Webinar link and instructions to join the call will be sent via email at 10:00 a.m. EDT on September 16 to anyone who has filled out the RSVP form. This event will be recorded and posted to the event page after the event date. Please RSVP to receive an email notification once it is posted. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/the-ethics-and-politics-of-guantanamo-bay/ LOCATION:Online via Zoom Webinar CATEGORIES:Community,Religious/Spiritual,Social Justice,Special Events ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://www.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/GuantanamoBayProtest_landscape-1.jpg END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200917T140000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200917T160000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200907T163945Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200921T173449Z UID:40825-1600351200-1600358400@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Decolonizing Global Health Seminar Series DESCRIPTION:Please join the Science\, Technology and International Affairs Program (STIA) and the Center for Global Health Science and Security (GHSS) for a new seminar series on Decolonizing Global Health. This series is offered in conjunction with a new 1-credit course in the STIA program\, STIA 408\, led by Professors Claire Standley and Emily Mendenhall. The talks take place on select Thursdays at 2pm and are open to the Georgetown community. \nThe concept of “decolonialization” of academic curricula and research partnerships has gained momentum in recent years\, stemming from frustrations at the implicit and explicit ways in which Western cultural\, political\, and educational hegemony pervade virtually all disciplines. In global health\, false narratives of objectivity\, universality\, and apolitical interests cloud the realities of historical roots in European and North American colonial endeavors. \nWant to learn more? Georgetown students can RSVP here to join the Zoom room for individual lectures – please see the links below. Those students who succesfully RSVP for the event will receive a google calendar invite with the Zoom meeting link. \nNot a Georgetown student? You can watch the sessions streamed live over YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/c/DecolonizingGlobalHealth and submit questions in the comments! \n**Please note that registration for any of the individual seminars indicates your consent to have your video and audio live streamed to the “Decolonizing Global Health” YouTube channel\, as well as recorded for later public posting. \n  \nSeminar Schedule \nAugust 26 – Global Health Research Needs a Makeover \nProfessor Madhukar Pai\, Canada Research Chair in Epidemiology & Global Health\, McGill University & Director\, McGill International TB Centre \n  \nSeptember 7* – The Colonial Legacy: Re-thinking Health Equity in the Global South \nDr. Maria Amelia Viteri (University of Maryland\, USA & Universidad San Francisco de Quito\, Ecuador) \n*Note that this session occurs on a Monday \n  \nSeptember 17 – Global health\, Development\, and Colonialism \nDr. Lucy Gilson (University of Cape Town\, South Africa) and Dr. Mosa Moshabela (University of KwaZulu-Natal\, South Africa) \n  \nSeptember 24 – Indigenous knowledge in public health \nDr. Eli Nelson (Williams College\, USA) \nAssistant Professor\, American Studies and Science and Technology Studies Programs \nMedicine has an especially capacious definition in Indigenous contexts\, touching on topics and relationships in the realms of religion\, governance\, diplomacy\, environmental sciences\, and more. Indigenous doctors and public health authorities have long argued that decolonizing or reforming public health requires a holistic approach that can be incommensurable with settler and other colonial modes of risk assessment\, care\, and future planning. In this lecture\, I will provide a broad historical and contemporary view of Indigenous medicine and public health on Turtle Island\, focusing on the roles it has played in Indigenous assertions of sovereignty\, land\, spirit\, and futurity. We will start with a review of how Indigenous medicine and knowledge was deployed in epidemics in the 17th century\, followed by reservation medicine during the Red Progressive era\, Indigenous feminist public health movements in the 20th century\, and concluding with a note on how Native science and medicine produces community care and protection amidst climate change and Covid-19 crises. \n  \nOctober 1 – Health equity and reform (Time TBD) \nDr. Devaki Nambiar (The George Institute for Global Health\, India) \n  \nOctober 8 – Increasing research equity and autonomy \nDr. Ngozi Erondu (Chatham House\, UK & Project Zambezi\, Zimbabwe) \n  \nOctober 15 – Effecting change in academia / Colonial legacies in mental health \nDr. Anouska Bhattacharyya (YW Boston\, USA) \n  \nWeek of October 19: Capstone Panel (Date/Time TBD) \nDr. Akiiki Bitalabeho\, Dr. Zahirah McNatt (University of Global Health Equity\, Rwanda & Partners in Health | Inshuti Mu Buzima\, Rwanda) URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/decolonizing-global-health-seminar-series/2020-09-17/ LOCATION:Remote Online\, Remote Online\, US CATEGORIES:Academic Events ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://www.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/https-_cdn.evbuc_.com_images_110414363_110057598857_1_original.20200903-201623-e1599496376995.jpg ORGANIZER;CN="Obdulio%20Moronta":MAILTO:om111@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200918T110000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200918T120000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200831T151618Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200917T222916Z UID:37737-1600426800-1600430400@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:CS Colloquium: Distinguished Speaker Series: Madhu Sudan (Harvard) DESCRIPTION:Communication Amid Uncertainty \nOne of the basic goals of the theory of computing is to model behaviour of “intelligent” systems (computers or humans). Behaviour includes ability to acquire information (or knowledge)\, analyzing it (or reasoning) and communicating it. The theories of Turing (universal computation) and Shannon (reliable communication) offer the foundations for this study covering much of the terrain. And the remarkable progress in the technologies of computing and communication is a testament to the success of these theories. Unfortunately this success has also exposed problems in the intersection of the two fields that neither captures adequately. In our work on “communication amid uncertainty” we explore some such problems\, where the ability of two communicating entities to compute allows them to acquire large *mostly* common context. The commonality of the context should enable communication to be even more efficient. On the other hand the “uncertainty” about the context (the fact the context is only mostly common) leads to novel mathematical questions that challenge the fundamental aspects of the classical theories. In this talk we will briefly describe some of the questions and our (partial) answers in this setting of communication with uncertainty. \nhttps://madhu.seas.harvard.edu/ \nGoogle scholar:  https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=D-RwB3YAAAAJ&hl=en URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/cs-colloquium-distinguished-speaker-series-madhu-sudan-harvard/ LOCATION:Virtual (Zoom info will be sent out to the email lists)\, Virtual (Zoom info will be sent out to the email lists)\, US CATEGORIES:Academic Events END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200918T120000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200918T130000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200903T180007Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200908T135258Z UID:38429-1600430400-1600434000@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Psychology - Gil Sherman Memorial Lecture DESCRIPTION:Please RSVP to receive Zoom link the day of the event. \nSpeaker \nPatricia K. Kuhl\, Ph.D.\nCo-Director\, Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences\nDirector\, NSF Science of Learning Center (The LIFE Center)\nUniversity of Washington \nTitle \nThe Puzzle of Human Language Acquisition: Advancing Theory Through the Science of Learning \nAbstract \nDebate on the origins of humans’ capacity for language has engaged philosophers\, psychologists\, neuroscientists\, and biologists\, and more recently engineers and computer scientists who seek to create technologies that process natural language. In this talk\, I will show how behavioral and brain science in young infants is revising traditional views on the mechanisms underlying human language\, with a renewed emphasis on the mechanisms of learning. I will describe a theoretical model that addresses the initial state of language learning as well as the role of experience in learning. The main tenet is that\, in early language acquisition\, children’s statistical learning and computational skills are ‘gated’ by the social brain. Natural social interaction ignites the sensorimotor brain networks that underpin language\, and this helps explain why young children have trouble learning from screens. This model has led to the discovery of linguistic biomarkers that may allow early diagnosis of disabilities such as autism. \nSpeaker Bio \nDr. Patricia K. Kuhl holds the Bezos Family Foundation Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning\, Co-Director of the UW Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences\, and Professor of Speech and Hearing Sciences at the University of Washington in Seattle. She is internationally recognized for her research on early language learning and bilingual brain development\, for pioneering brain measures on young children\, and for studies that show how young children learn. She presented her work at two White House conferences (Clinton White House in 1997 and Bush White House in 2001). Dr. Kuhl is a member of the National Academy of Sciences\, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences\, the Rodin Academy\, and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. She is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science\, the Acoustical Society of America\, the American Psychological Society\, and the Cognitive Science Society. Dr. Kuhl was awarded the Silver Medal of the Acoustical Society of America in 1997. She received the University of Washington’s Faculty Lectureship Award in 1998. In 2005\, she was awarded the Kenneth Craik Research Award from Cambridge University\, and in 2007\, the University of Minnesota’s Outstanding Achievement Award. In Paris in 2008\, Dr. Kuhl was awarded the Gold Medal of the Acoustical Society of America for her work on early learning and brain development. In 2011\, Dr. Kuhl received the IPSEN Foundation’s Jean-Louis Signoret Neuropsychology Prize\, and in 2013 the William James Lifetime Achievement award. In 2014\, Dr. Kuhl was awarded an Honorary Doctorate from Stockholm University\, and in 2015 the George A. Miller Prize in Cognitive Neuroscience. Dr. Kuhl received the American Psychological Association’s Distinguished Scientific Contributions Award in 2018\, and received an Honorary Doctorate from the Erikson Institute in 2020. Dr. Kuhl is co-author of The Scientist in the Crib: Minds\, Brains\, and How Children Learn (Harper Collins). Dr. Kuhl’s TED talk can be viewed at: http://www.ted.com/talks/patricia_kuhl_the_linguistic_genius_of_babies.html URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/psychology-gil-sherman-memorial-lecture/ LOCATION:Virtual via Zoom\, Virtual via Zoom\, US ORGANIZER;CN="Department%20of%20Psychology":MAILTO:psychology@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200921T090000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200921T103000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200904T171108Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200918T142810Z UID:38522-1600678800-1600684200@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Palestinian Refugees in International Law DESCRIPTION:Expanding the seminal contribution of the first edition (1998)\, Palestinian Refugees in International Law offers a clear and comprehensive analysis of the Palestinian refugee question in light of various areas of international law\, shedding light on: the distinctive regime set up for them\, their status and rights (as refugees\, often stateless persons\, protected at times of war and internal displacement) but also their actual treatment in about fifty countries. It ultimately probes the relevance of international norms to the provision of international protection for Palestinian refugees and their quest for durable solutions. \nAuthors: \nFrancesca P. Albanese is an Affiliate Researcher with the Georgetown University Institute for the Study of International Migration (ISIM). She worked as a Legal Officer for the Department of Legal Affairs of UNRWA\, and the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights before then. \nDr. Lex Takkenberg has worked with UNRWA since 1989. He is the former Chief of the Ethics Office of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East. \nSpeakers: \nKaren AbuZayd is currently a Commissioner for the United Nations Commission of Inquiry on Syria\, mandated by the United Nations Human Rights Council in 2011. \nElizabeth Campbell is director of UNRWA’s Representative Office in Washington\, D.C. \nDr. Elizabeth Ferris is an ISIM Research Professor at Georgetown and a non-resident senior fellow in Foreign Policy at the Brookings Institution. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/the-status-of-palestinian-refugees-in-international-law/ LOCATION:Via Zoom\, Via Zoom\, US ORGANIZER;CN="Institute%20for%20the%20Study%20of%20International%20Migration":MAILTO:isim@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200921T130000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200921T140000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200612T181818Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200916T144605Z UID:35780-1600693200-1600696800@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Statistical\, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Consultation Services DESCRIPTION:Department of Biostatistics\, Bioinformatics & Biomathematics offers statistical and bioinformatics consulting and collaboration covering a broad range of study design\, statistical analysis and data science issues including experimental design for pre-clinical investigations\, clinical trials\, population studies\, and Big Data analytics (e.g.\, predictive & risk modeling\, statistical analysis of next-generation sequence data and omics data).  We are actively involved in cutting-edge work in cancer research\, neurological disorders\, epidemiological studies\, as well as in statistical and bioinformatics methods research and development projects.  We can collaborate in writing and implementing competitive project proposals involving methodological and software development. \nOne-Hour Complimentary Consultation (GU only)\nA free complimentary consultation (up to 60 minutes) is available to members of the GU community by appointment\, every Monday 1pm – 2pm.  Appointments can be used to address general statistical questions on data or analysis issues in a research study project\, etc.  Service is limited to one appointment per person/group per semester.  Please be advised that work beyond one-hour will incur a fee. \nTo request a complimentary consultation\, email dbbb@georgetown.edu and include: \n\nEmail Subject: “Complimentary Consultation”\nContact Information (e.g. name\, email & phone)\nWorking Title & Brief Description (e.g. one paragraph) \nType of Assistance Requested\nStage of the Project (e.g. planning\, design\, data collection\, etc.)\n\nMore information URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/statistical-biostatistics-and-bioinformatics-consultation/2020-09-21/ LOCATION:Online CATEGORIES:Research ORGANIZER;CN="Department%20of%20Biostatistics":MAILTO:dbbb@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200921T130000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200921T140000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200917T193853Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200917T193853Z UID:40318-1600693200-1600696800@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Statistical\, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Consultation Services DESCRIPTION:Department of Biostatistics\, Bioinformatics & Biomathematics offers statistical and bioinformatics consulting and collaboration covering a broad range of study design\, statistical analysis and data science issues including experimental design for pre-clinical investigations\, clinical trials\, population studies\, and Big Data analytics (e.g.\, predictive & risk modeling\, statistical analysis of next-generation sequence data and omics data).  We are actively involved in cutting-edge work in cancer research\, neurological disorders\, epidemiological studies\, as well as in statistical and bioinformatics methods research and development projects.  We can collaborate in writing and implementing competitive project proposals involving methodological and software development. \nOne-Hour Complimentary Consultation (GU only)\nA free complimentary consultation (up to 60 minutes) is available to members of the GU community by appointment\, every Monday 1pm – 2pm.  Appointments can be used to address general statistical questions on data or analysis issues in a research study project\, etc.  Service is limited to one appointment per person/group per semester.  Please be advised that work beyond one-hour will incur a fee. \nTo request a complimentary consultation\, email dbbb@georgetown.edu and include: \n\nEmail Subject: “Complimentary Consultation”\nContact Information (e.g. name\, email & phone)\nWorking Title & Brief Description (e.g. one paragraph) \nType of Assistance Requested\nStage of the Project (e.g. planning\, design\, data collection\, etc.)\n\nMore information URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/statistical-biostatistics-and-bioinformatics-consultation-services-2/ LOCATION:Online CATEGORIES:Research END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200921T130000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200921T143000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200911T183543Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200918T191059Z UID:40840-1600693200-1600698600@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Russian Conversation Hours DESCRIPTION:Russian conversation hour for those learning the language. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/russian-conversation-hours-2/2020-09-21/ LOCATION:RSVP to receive a link to Zoom meeting – russconversations@georgetown.edu\, RSVP to receive a link to Zoom meeting - russconversations@georgetown.edu\, US ORGANIZER;CN="Marina%20Samkharadze":MAILTO:ms2395@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200921T140000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200921T153000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200803T170440Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200918T191059Z UID:35605-1600696800-1600702200@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:The Theological Legacy of Gerard Mannion DESCRIPTION:The late Gerard Mannion\, holder of the Amaturo Chair in Catholic Studies at Georgetown University and a senior research fellow at the Berkley Center for Religion\, Peace\, and World Affairs\, was a dynamic and creative theologian at the cutting edge of issues relating to church and society\, ecumenical and interreligious dialogue\, and ecclesial identity. Mannion published widely in the fields of ecclesiology\, ethics\, and public theology\, as well as in systematic theology and philosophy. His unexpected death on September 21\, 2019\, was a loss to Georgetown University and the theological community worldwide. \nIn commemoration of the first anniversary of his death\, this online discussion will bring together a number of Mannion’s colleagues to consider the contributions he made to the church\, the academy\, and the world. Acclaimed theologians Mark Chapman and Vladimir Latinovic will speak about their forthcoming book Changing the Church: Transformations of Christian Belief\, Practice\, and Life (2020)\, which honors Mannion’s legacy. Peter Phan\, Cristina Lledo Gomez\, and Brian Flanagan will respond and reflect on the theological contributions of Gerard Mannion. The conversation will be moderated by Dale Irvin and Patricia Madigan. \nThis event is co-sponsored by Georgetown University’s Department of Theology and Religious Studies\, Global Irish Studies Initiative\, and Berkley Center for Religion\, Peace\, and World Affairs in collaboration with the Ecclesiological Investigations International Research Network. \nThe Zoom Webinar link and instructions to join the call will be sent via email at 10:00 a.m. EDT on September 21 to anyone who has filled out the RSVP form. This event will be recorded and posted to the event page after the event date. Please RSVP to receive an email notification once it is posted. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/the-theological-legacy-of-gerard-mannion/ LOCATION:Online via Zoom Webinar CATEGORIES:Academic Events,Religious/Spiritual,Research ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://www.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/GerardMannionCommemoration_landscape-1.jpg END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200921T150000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200921T160000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200825T164023Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200918T190134Z UID:37175-1600700400-1600704000@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Virtual Villa Le Balze: The Decameron and the Hoyasaxon DESCRIPTION:Storytelling and the Plague\, Yesterday and Today\nThe first event of our Virtual Villa Le Balze series will be a lecture with Professor Laura Benedetti of the Georgetown University Italian Department. Prof. Benedetti holds the Laura and Gaetano De Sole Professorship of Contemporary Italian Culture and has served as a Faculty in Residence at Villa Le Balze. \nWith the participation of: \n– Peter DiGiovanni\n– Anne Dyer Fontaine\n– Michael Mazzariello\n– Jacqueline Nowakowski \nIn Spring 2020\, as the COVID pandemic swept through the U.S. and forced Georgetown University to switch to distance learning\, a group of students and their professor found inspiration in Giovanni Boccaccio’s Decameron\, a collection of novellas told during the great pestilence of the mid-1300s. Like their medieval counterparts\, each of these contemporary storytellers became queen or king for a day\, entertaining the rest of the group with a tale that best illustrated an issue central to their lives. Ideally set against the virtual background of the Tuscan hills around Villa Le Balze\, the Hoyasaxon constitutes the result of their collective endeavor. \nThis will event will be hosted on Zoom. Webinar details will be sent after registering via Eventbrite. \nAccommodation requests related to a disability should be sent to villainfo@georgetown.edu by September 16\, 2020. A good-faith effort will be made to fulfill requests. A captioned version of this presentation will also be made available by September 30\, 2020 at villalebalze.georgetown.edu. \nAll events in the series are in support of Villa Le Balze’s Loggia Fund. Supporting the Loggia Fund will allow the Villa to have increased space for programming and will help ensure the Villa’s long term financial viability. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/virtual-villa-le-balze-a-modern-day-decameron/ LOCATION:Villa Le Balze\, Virtual\, Fiesole\, 50014\, Italy CATEGORIES:Academic Events,Alumni,Lecture,Special Events ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/png:https://www.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/VLB-garden-GU-events-calendar-image.png ORGANIZER;CN="Mia%20Pezzanite":MAILTO:mep92@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200922T120000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200922T133000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200907T190831Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200909T212627Z UID:38713-1600776000-1600781400@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:CSS Speaker Series | Keir Lieber on The Myth of the Nuclear Revolution DESCRIPTION:Join the Center for Security Studies for a discussion with CSS Director Keir Lieber. Dr. Lieber will discuss his new book\, “The Myth of the Nuclear Revolution\,” in which he and coauthor Daryl G. Press tackle the central puzzle of the nuclear age: the persistence of intense geopolitical competition in the shadow of nuclear weapons. \nCopies of the book are available through East City Bookshop. \nRegistration through Zoom is required for this event\, which is part of CSS’s fall series on Politics and Security. For requests for accommodations such as closed captioning due to a disability or medical condition\, contact sspmediafellow@georgetown.edu no later than Thursday\, September 17. A good faith effort will be made to fulfill all accommodation requests. \nAbout the Book\nLeading analysts have predicted for decades that nuclear weapons would help pacify international politics. The core notion is that countries protected by these fearsome weapons can stop competing so intensely with their adversaries: they can end their arms races\, scale back their alliances\, and stop jockeying for strategic territory. But rarely have theory and practice been so opposed. Why do international relations in the nuclear age remain so competitive? Indeed\, why are today’s major geopolitical rivalries intensifying? \nIn The Myth of the Nuclear Revolution\, Keir A. Lieber and Daryl G. Press tackle the central puzzle of the nuclear age: the persistence of intense geopolitical competition in the shadow of nuclear weapons. They explain why the Cold War superpowers raced so feverishly against each other; why the creation of “mutual assured destruction” does not ensure peace; and why the rapid technological changes of the 21st century will weaken deterrence in critical hotspots around the world. \nBy explaining how the nuclear revolution falls short\, Lieber and Press discover answers to the most pressing questions about deterrence in the coming decades: how much capability is required for a reliable nuclear deterrent\, how conventional conflicts may become nuclear wars\, and how great care is required now to prevent new technology from ushering in an age of nuclear instability. \nAbout the Speaker\nKeir Lieber is Director of the Center for Security Studies and Security Studies Program\, and Professor in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service and the Department of Government at Georgetown University. \nProfessor Lieber’s research and teaching interests include nuclear weapons\, deterrence\, and strategy; technology and the causes of war; U.S. national security policy; and international relations theory. He is co-author\, with Daryl Press of Dartmouth College\, of The Myth of the Nuclear Revolution: Power Politics in the Atomic Age (Cornell University Press\, 2020); author of War and the Engineers: The Primacy of Politics over Technology (Cornell University Press\, 2005); and editor of War\, Peace\, and International Political Realism (University of Notre Dame Press\, 2009). His articles have appeared in leading scholarly and foreign policy publications\, including International Security\, Security Studies\, Foreign Affairs\, and the Atlantic Monthly. He has been awarded major fellowships from the Brookings Institution\, Carnegie Corporation of New York\, Council on Foreign Relations\, Earhart Foundation\, MacArthur Foundation\, and Smith Richardson Foundation. Dr. Lieber received his Ph.D. and M.A. in political science from the University of Chicago\, and his B.A. in political science and international relations from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/css-speaker-series-keir-lieber-on-the-myth-of-the-nuclear-revolution/ LOCATION:Zoom\, Zoom\, US CATEGORIES:Academic Events,Lecture,Research ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://www.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/Myth-of-the-Nuclear-Revolution_cover-scaled-e1599578349765.jpg ORGANIZER;CN="Center%20for%20Security%20Studies":MAILTO:securitystudies@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200922T120000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200922T130000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200915T213816Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200915T213816Z UID:40085-1600776000-1600779600@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Graduate School of Arts & Sciences Webinar: Admissions Information Session DESCRIPTION:GSAS Admissions Information Session webinars cover the same content as an on-campus session: background about Georgetown\, the application process\, financial aid\, and some discussion of student life. Special Topic webinars provide detailed advice on different aspects of the graduate school application process and student experience. Webinars will last anywhere between 30 minutes to an hour depending on the topic URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/graduate-school-of-arts-sciences-webinar-admissions-information-session/ LOCATION:Online Event\, Online Event\, US CATEGORIES:Admissions ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://www.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/GU_GSAS_Social.jpg ORGANIZER;CN="Office%20of%20Graduate%20Admissions":MAILTO:gradmail@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200923T130000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200923T143000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200911T183543Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200918T191100Z UID:40841-1600866000-1600871400@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Russian Conversation Hours DESCRIPTION:Russian conversation hour for those learning the language. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/russian-conversation-hours-2/2020-09-23/ LOCATION:RSVP to receive a link to Zoom meeting – russconversations@georgetown.edu\, RSVP to receive a link to Zoom meeting - russconversations@georgetown.edu\, US ORGANIZER;CN="Marina%20Samkharadze":MAILTO:ms2395@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200923T173000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200923T184500 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200915T140246Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200915T140246Z UID:39680-1600882200-1600886700@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:The 2020 U.S. Elections: A Test for Voting Rights\, Free Speech\, and Democracy DESCRIPTION:Through good times and bad\, war and peace\, economic prosperity and calamity\, civil disorder and calm\, the United States has maintained confidence in its democratic values and its unique electoral process throughout its history. That confidence has been shaken this year\, however\, by evidence of voter suppression\, online misinformation and disinformation\, and international inference\, and by questions about the ability of the U.S. Postal Service to handle mail-in ballots during a public health emergency. \nJoin Deborah Turner\, president of the League of Women Voters; Michael Waldman\, president of the Brennan Center for Justice; Dale Ho\, director of the ACLU’s Voting Rights Project; and Amy Gardner\, a national political reporter at The Washington Post\, as they examine these issues – and whether the American public will be able to have confidence in this year’s election results — at a virtual forum moderated by Sanford J. Ungar\, director of the Free Speech Project at Georgetown University\, on Wednesday\, September 23. \nRSVP required. Link to come. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/the-2020-u-s-elections-a-test-for-voting-rights-free-speech-and-democracy/ LOCATION:Zoom\, Zoom\, US CATEGORIES:Lecture ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://www.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/09.12.2020.02.jpg ORGANIZER;CN="Khoury%20Johnson":MAILTO:krj40@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200924T123000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200924T134500 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200915T135718Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200915T174415Z UID:40006-1600950600-1600955100@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Religious and Secular Global Dialogue: A Conversation with Azza Karam DESCRIPTION:Dr. Azza Karam serves as the secretary general of Religions for Peace\, the world’s largest multireligious leadership platform. She has been at the forefront of examining international political and religious dynamics from both an academic perspective and as a practitioner in the field. Currently a professor of religion and development at the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam\, Karam has also served in different positions in the United Nations since 2004\, as well as other intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations since the early 1990s. She has observed the changing nature of secular/religious and interreligious dialogue at the highest levels of global leadership\, as well as on the ground in communities around the world. \nIn this conversation\, Karam will join Berkley Center Senior Fellow José Casanova to discuss the evolution of the role of major religious bodies and multinational faith-based organizations on the world stage and at the United Nations. They will then turn to topics of religious pluralism and mutual recognition of religions\, examining the role of dialogue at different levels of engagement. Successes situated in context of the history of global dialogue\, as well as emerging challenges\, will be discussed. This conversation builds on four others in the ongoing Global Religious and Secular Dynamic Discussion Series. \nThis event is co-sponsored by Georgetown University’s Berkley Center for Religion\, Peace\, and World Affairs and Reset Dialogues on Civilizations. \nThe Zoom Webinar link and instructions to join the call will be sent via email at 10:00 a.m. EDT on September 24 to anyone who has filled out the RSVP form. This event will be recorded and a captioned video will be posted to this page after the event date. Please RSVP to receive an email notification once it is posted. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/religious-and-secular-global-dialogue-a-conversation-with-azza-karam/ LOCATION:Online via Zoom Webinar CATEGORIES:Academic Events,Religious/Spiritual,Special Events ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://www.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/UnitedNationsHeadquartersFlags_landscape.jpg END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200924T140000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200924T160000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200907T163945Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200921T173450Z UID:40826-1600956000-1600963200@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Decolonizing Global Health Seminar Series DESCRIPTION:Please join the Science\, Technology and International Affairs Program (STIA) and the Center for Global Health Science and Security (GHSS) for a new seminar series on Decolonizing Global Health. This series is offered in conjunction with a new 1-credit course in the STIA program\, STIA 408\, led by Professors Claire Standley and Emily Mendenhall. The talks take place on select Thursdays at 2pm and are open to the Georgetown community. \nThe concept of “decolonialization” of academic curricula and research partnerships has gained momentum in recent years\, stemming from frustrations at the implicit and explicit ways in which Western cultural\, political\, and educational hegemony pervade virtually all disciplines. In global health\, false narratives of objectivity\, universality\, and apolitical interests cloud the realities of historical roots in European and North American colonial endeavors. \nWant to learn more? Georgetown students can RSVP here to join the Zoom room for individual lectures – please see the links below. Those students who succesfully RSVP for the event will receive a google calendar invite with the Zoom meeting link. \nNot a Georgetown student? You can watch the sessions streamed live over YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/c/DecolonizingGlobalHealth and submit questions in the comments! \n**Please note that registration for any of the individual seminars indicates your consent to have your video and audio live streamed to the “Decolonizing Global Health” YouTube channel\, as well as recorded for later public posting. \n  \nSeminar Schedule \nAugust 26 – Global Health Research Needs a Makeover \nProfessor Madhukar Pai\, Canada Research Chair in Epidemiology & Global Health\, McGill University & Director\, McGill International TB Centre \n  \nSeptember 7* – The Colonial Legacy: Re-thinking Health Equity in the Global South \nDr. Maria Amelia Viteri (University of Maryland\, USA & Universidad San Francisco de Quito\, Ecuador) \n*Note that this session occurs on a Monday \n  \nSeptember 17 – Global health\, Development\, and Colonialism \nDr. Lucy Gilson (University of Cape Town\, South Africa) and Dr. Mosa Moshabela (University of KwaZulu-Natal\, South Africa) \n  \nSeptember 24 – Indigenous knowledge in public health \nDr. Eli Nelson (Williams College\, USA) \nAssistant Professor\, American Studies and Science and Technology Studies Programs \nMedicine has an especially capacious definition in Indigenous contexts\, touching on topics and relationships in the realms of religion\, governance\, diplomacy\, environmental sciences\, and more. Indigenous doctors and public health authorities have long argued that decolonizing or reforming public health requires a holistic approach that can be incommensurable with settler and other colonial modes of risk assessment\, care\, and future planning. In this lecture\, I will provide a broad historical and contemporary view of Indigenous medicine and public health on Turtle Island\, focusing on the roles it has played in Indigenous assertions of sovereignty\, land\, spirit\, and futurity. We will start with a review of how Indigenous medicine and knowledge was deployed in epidemics in the 17th century\, followed by reservation medicine during the Red Progressive era\, Indigenous feminist public health movements in the 20th century\, and concluding with a note on how Native science and medicine produces community care and protection amidst climate change and Covid-19 crises. \n  \nOctober 1 – Health equity and reform (Time TBD) \nDr. Devaki Nambiar (The George Institute for Global Health\, India) \n  \nOctober 8 – Increasing research equity and autonomy \nDr. Ngozi Erondu (Chatham House\, UK & Project Zambezi\, Zimbabwe) \n  \nOctober 15 – Effecting change in academia / Colonial legacies in mental health \nDr. Anouska Bhattacharyya (YW Boston\, USA) \n  \nWeek of October 19: Capstone Panel (Date/Time TBD) \nDr. Akiiki Bitalabeho\, Dr. Zahirah McNatt (University of Global Health Equity\, Rwanda & Partners in Health | Inshuti Mu Buzima\, Rwanda) URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/decolonizing-global-health-seminar-series/2020-09-24/ LOCATION:Remote Online\, Remote Online\, US CATEGORIES:Academic Events ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://www.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/https-_cdn.evbuc_.com_images_110414363_110057598857_1_original.20200903-201623-e1599496376995.jpg ORGANIZER;CN="Obdulio%20Moronta":MAILTO:om111@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200925T100000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200925T110000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200611T035103Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200914T232329Z UID:32478-1601028000-1601031600@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Biostatistics Seminar Series - Philip Westgate\, Ph.D. DESCRIPTION:Philip Westgate\, Ph.D.\nAssociate Professor\, Department of Biostatistics; Associate Director\, Biostatistics & Research Design Core\, Center for Health Equity Transformation\, University of Kentucky \n“Study Design and Statistical Analysis Options for Cluster Randomized Trials: Examples Utilizing Stepped Wedge Designs and Generalized Estimating Equations” \nAbstract: Cluster randomized trials (CRTs) are often used in public health research in which the intervention is naturally applied to clusters\, or groups\, of individuals. Common examples include schools\, medical care practices\, and even entire communities. In this talk\, we introduce possible study design and statistical analysis options for cluster randomized trial. Utilizing real-life examples\, we focus on stepped wedge designs and the use of generalized estimating equations. Furthermore\, because CRTs often involve only a small number of clusters\, small-sample adjustments with the GEE approach are explored. \nPlease RSVP to receive a Zoom link. \nBio3 Seminar Series sponsored by Department of Biostatistics\, Bioinformatics & Biomathematics (DBBB) URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/bio3-2020-09-25/ LOCATION:Virtual via Zoom\, Virtual via Zoom\, US CATEGORIES:Academic Events ORGANIZER;CN="Department%20of%20Biostatistics":MAILTO:dbbb@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200925T120000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200925T133000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200910T192633Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200915T174533Z UID:39271-1601035200-1601040600@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:The American Pilgrimage Project: Conversations on Race and Islamophobia DESCRIPTION:The American Pilgrimage Project (APP)\, a university partnership with StoryCorps\, invites Americans of diverse backgrounds to sit together and talk to each other one-to-one about the role their religious beliefs have played at crucial moments in their lives. As the project launches its new website\, we are convening participants for a live event in which they’ll consider the issues they discussed in their StoryCorps conversations and point them toward the present. \nIn a conversation at Millsaps College in Jackson\, Mississippi\, divinity school students Chandra Crane and KeNosha Whitehead discussed their struggles with Christian faith and racial identity. Now the two friends are both ordained ministers\, and they’ll revisit the topic in light of the Black Lives Matter movement and the protests of summer 2020. At Wayne State University in Detroit\, Michigan\, Afifah Latif and Hamzah Latif – brother and sister\, both observant Muslims – reflected on their encounters with Islamophobia in the period after the 9/11 attacks. In this live event\, they’ll revisit the issue of Islamophobia and speak about the experience of being American Muslims in 2020. The event builds upon a January 2017 APP event\, “Faith and Race: True Stories from Everyday Life.” Paul Elie\, Berkley Center senior fellow and director of the American Pilgrimage Project\, will moderate the discussion. \nThe Zoom Webinar link and instructions to join the call will be sent via email at 10:00 a.m. EDT on September 25 to anyone who has filled out the RSVP form. This event will be recorded and a captioned video will be posted to the event page after the event date. Please RSVP to receive an email notification once it is posted. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/the-american-pilgrimage-project-conversations-on-race-and-islamophobia/ LOCATION:Online via Zoom Webinar CATEGORIES:Community,Racial Justice,Religious/Spiritual,Social Justice,Special Events END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200925T123000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200925T133000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200817T232059Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200917T182044Z UID:36339-1601037000-1601040600@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Instructional Continuity Office Hours DESCRIPTION:Do you want to learn how to use online Instructional Continuity tools?\nOpen to all Georgetown University faculty and staff\, these online office hours are designed to provide assistance with and answer questions around tools used for Instructional Continuity. \nTools typically discussed: \n\nPanopto Lecture Capture: Record your computer’s desktop display\, audio and video and share with students asynchronously.\nZoom Web Conferencing: Hold live virtual classes that can be attended on a desktop computer\, laptop or mobile device. Discover best practices to deliver high quality online synchronous learning sessions.\n\nVoicethread Rich asynchronous conversations around images\, video clips\, documents\, and slide presentations: Students and instructors can post and comment using text\, audio\, video\, and/or drawing.\n\nCanvas Learning Management System: Share materials with students\, as well as facilitate synchronous and asynchronous communications and collaborations.\n\nClicking “Register” on the left side of this page will route you to the UIS Training at Georgetown EventBrite page where you will officially register. After you register\, you will receive an email with information on how to join the online office hours and again by email prior to the event. \nOffice hours are offered by UIS Edtech and will be delivered through Zoom web conferencing. For more information on Instructional Continuity\, please visit: http://instructionalcontinuity.georgetown.edu/ URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/instructional-continuity-office-hours-12/ LOCATION:Online\, Online\, US CATEGORIES:Instructional Continuity,Training ORGANIZER;CN="UIS%20Training":MAILTO:train@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200925T123000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200925T133000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200828T080750Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200917T184130Z UID:37718-1601037000-1601040600@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Global Challenges Symposium: Geopolitical Impact DESCRIPTION:Register for the discussion here! \nThe Global Challenges Symposium is a weekly discussion open to graduate students in the SFS about how the COVID pandemic is impacting the world order. Weekly discussions will be led by an SFS faculty member about the week’s recorded interviews. These will take place every Friday from 12:30-1:30pm. You can view a full schedule of the symposium here. \nThe video for the September 18\, “Great Power Competition\,” discussion will be released on Tuesday\, September 15. Seats for each week’s discussion are limited\, and 25 students will be selected to be in a live conversation while the remainder will be able to watch the discussion. \n If you are invited to participate in the week’s discussion by your professor or through your program\, you do not need to enter the lottery for that session. Registration will close 2 days before the event. We will notify you before 5:00pm on Wednesday\, September 16 if you were selected for a discussion seat. \nGlobal Challenges Symposium: Geopolitical Impact \nSpeakers \nJohn McNeill\, Professor of History at the School of Foreign Service\nCharles Kupchan\, Professor of International Affairs in the School of Foreign Service and Government Department\, Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations\nAnne-Marie Slaughter\, J.D.\, Dr.\, CEO of New America\, Former Dean of Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs\, Former Director of Policy Planning for the U.S. Department of State\, Former President of the American Society of International Law \nFriday Discussant:  John McNeill\, Professor of History at the School of Foreign Service URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/global-challenges-symposium-great-power-competition/ LOCATION:Zoom CATEGORIES:Academic Events ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/png:https://www.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/Global-Challenges-Cover-Photo.png ORGANIZER;CN="Master%20of%20Science%20in%20Foreign%20Service":MAILTO:msfsevents@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200925T150000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200925T160000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200907T035149Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200918T191101Z UID:38633-1601046000-1601049600@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:CS Colloquium: Moon Duchin (Tufts U.) DESCRIPTION:Title:  “TopDown” \nAbstract:  The Census will deploy a “differentially private” disclosure avoidance mechanism for its 2010 Decennial release.  That is\, it will intentionally introduce random noise to all the numbers that are released– but in a controlled way that you can prove theorems about.  This is causing elation in some circles (e.g.\, CS departments) and panic in others (e.g.\, community organizers and voting rights litigators).  I’ll talk about a year-long project with Aloni Cohen\, JN Matthews\, Bhushan Suwal\, and Peter Wayner to explore the properties of the Census algorithm — partly by actually running the TopDown code! — with a serious eye to the civil rights impacts\, especially racially polarized voting and local redistricting. \nBio:  https://tischcollege.tufts.edu/people/faculty/moon-duchin \n  \nZOOM link will be sent out to the email lists. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/cs-colloquium-moon-duchin-tufts-u/ LOCATION:Virtual (Zoom info will be sent out to the email lists)\, Virtual (Zoom info will be sent out to the email lists)\, US CATEGORIES:Academic Events ORGANIZER;CN="Nazli%20Goharian":MAILTO:nazli.goharian@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200925T170000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200925T190000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200917T141850Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200917T152926Z UID:40706-1601053200-1601060400@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Ensuring Educational Equity and Justice in the COVID-19 Era: Lessons from DC Advocates and Policy-makers DESCRIPTION:Ensuring Educational Equity and Justice in the COVID-19 Era: Lessons from DC Advocates and Policy-makers\nA Virtual Panel Discussion featuring:\nLaShunda Hill (Executive Director\, Office for Students in the Care of DC at Office of the Deputy Mayor for Education)\nMaura Marino (CEO of Education Forward DC)\nMonique Cole-Gary (Ward 6 parent leader with DC Parents Amplifying Voices in Education (PAVE))\nPatricia Stamper (Teacher\, Miner Elementary School) URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/ensuring-educational-equity-and-justice-in-the-covid-19-era-lessons-from-dc-advocates-and-policy-makers/ LOCATION:Via Zoom\, Via Zoom\, US CATEGORIES:Special Events ATTACH;FMTTYPE=application/pdf:https://www.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/Spring-Speaker-Series-Flyer-9-25.pdf ORGANIZER;CN="Anne%20Musica":MAILTO:anne.musica@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200925T193000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200925T213000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200824T140253Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200918T191222Z UID:37072-1601062200-1601069400@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Psychology Major/Minor Declaration Session DESCRIPTION:Interested in majoring or minoring in Psychology? \nWondering what is required to be a psychology major or minor? \nYou can get all your questions answered and your declaration form approved at the Psychology Major/Minor Declaration Sessions! \nPlease RSVP to receive Zoom link. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/psychology-major-minor-declaration-session-2/ LOCATION:Virtual via Zoom\, Virtual via Zoom\, US ORGANIZER;CN="Department%20of%20Psychology":MAILTO:psychology@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200928T110000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200928T123000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200915T231603Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200917T180942Z UID:40130-1601290800-1601296200@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Zoom Office Hours DESCRIPTION:  \nDo you have questions about the announced change to Zoom meeting security settings?\n  \nOpen to all Georgetown University faculty and staff\, these online drop-in office hours are designed to provide assistance with and answers to questions you have about the September 27th changes to Zoom meeting settings. Learn best practices around how to enable and share meeting links with passcodes\, and/or how to use waiting rooms to manage participants. \nNo need to register\, simply click the Zoom link below to attend the drop-in Office Hours during the times listed: \nMonday\, September 28th\, 11am – 12:30pm \n\nZoom Meeting Link: https://georgetown.zoom.us/my/edtechtraining URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/zoom-office-hours/ LOCATION:Online\, Online\, US CATEGORIES:Instructional Continuity,Training ORGANIZER;CN="UIS%20Training":MAILTO:train@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200928T130000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200928T140000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200612T181818Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200916T144606Z UID:35781-1601298000-1601301600@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Statistical\, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Consultation Services DESCRIPTION:Department of Biostatistics\, Bioinformatics & Biomathematics offers statistical and bioinformatics consulting and collaboration covering a broad range of study design\, statistical analysis and data science issues including experimental design for pre-clinical investigations\, clinical trials\, population studies\, and Big Data analytics (e.g.\, predictive & risk modeling\, statistical analysis of next-generation sequence data and omics data).  We are actively involved in cutting-edge work in cancer research\, neurological disorders\, epidemiological studies\, as well as in statistical and bioinformatics methods research and development projects.  We can collaborate in writing and implementing competitive project proposals involving methodological and software development. \nOne-Hour Complimentary Consultation (GU only)\nA free complimentary consultation (up to 60 minutes) is available to members of the GU community by appointment\, every Monday 1pm – 2pm.  Appointments can be used to address general statistical questions on data or analysis issues in a research study project\, etc.  Service is limited to one appointment per person/group per semester.  Please be advised that work beyond one-hour will incur a fee. \nTo request a complimentary consultation\, email dbbb@georgetown.edu and include: \n\nEmail Subject: “Complimentary Consultation”\nContact Information (e.g. name\, email & phone)\nWorking Title & Brief Description (e.g. one paragraph) \nType of Assistance Requested\nStage of the Project (e.g. planning\, design\, data collection\, etc.)\n\nMore information URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/statistical-biostatistics-and-bioinformatics-consultation/2020-09-28/ LOCATION:Online CATEGORIES:Research ORGANIZER;CN="Department%20of%20Biostatistics":MAILTO:dbbb@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200928T130000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200928T143000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200911T183543Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200918T191222Z UID:40842-1601298000-1601303400@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Russian Conversation Hours DESCRIPTION:Russian conversation hour for those learning the language. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/russian-conversation-hours-2/2020-09-28/ LOCATION:RSVP to receive a link to Zoom meeting – russconversations@georgetown.edu\, RSVP to receive a link to Zoom meeting - russconversations@georgetown.edu\, US ORGANIZER;CN="Marina%20Samkharadze":MAILTO:ms2395@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200928T190000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200928T200000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200915T135935Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200918T191222Z UID:39930-1601319600-1601323200@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Sí Se Puede: Puerto Rican Lighting Designers DESCRIPTION:In this special event hosted by the Davis Performing Arts Center\, Puerto Rican Lighting Designers share their journey through their design process— from their design ideas to opening night and beyond. Helen Hayes Award-winning Lighting Designer Alberto Segarra convenes fellow Boricua designers with origins in designing for theater for a conversation about how their training in Puerto Rico reverberates through their artistic process and the many ways they make art today across borders and contexts. Guests include Maria Cristina Fusté\, Manuel Ramirez Guevara\, and Marién V. Rodriguez\, whose work ranges from museum installations to regional theater\, public festivals to private architectural spaces. FORUM WILL BE CONDUCTED IN ENGLISH \nThis discussion is a Special Event in Georgetown University’s Theater & Performance Studies Program’s 2020-2021 15th Anniversary Home Season\, “Seeds of Change: Reimagining the World\,” Professor Maya E. Roth\, Artistic Director. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/si-se-puede-puerto-rican-lighting-designers/ LOCATION:online via Zoom\, online CATEGORIES:Career,Special Events,Student Events,Theater ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://www.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/On_the_Lawn-scaled.jpg ORGANIZER;CN="Vanessa%20Gilbert":MAILTO:vg241@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200929T120000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200929T130000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200916T154025Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200921T213204Z UID:40122-1601380800-1601384400@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Diversity and Inclusion: A National Security Imperative DESCRIPTION:In a moment that has laid bare systemic racism and injustice\, join leading diplomats and national security practitioners for a conversation on why a diverse security sector is essential for effective U.S. foreign policy and national security–and how we achieve it. They will discuss best practices and strategies for cultivating diverse personnel and cultures of inclusion\, assess persistent shortcomings\, and chart new pathways for closing the gaps. \nRegistration through Zoom is required for this event\, which is co-hosted by the Georgetown Institute for Women\, Peace and Security (GIWPS) and the Center for Security Studies at Georgetown University as part of CSS’s fall speaker series on Politics and Security. Attendees are encouraged to submit questions to the panelists when registering for the event. \nThis event will have live closed captioning. For any other accommodation requests\, contact sspmediafellow@georgetown.edu no later than Thursday\, September 24. A good faith effort will be made to fulfill all accommodation requests. \nAbout the Speakers\nTravis Adkins\nAdjunct Assistant Professor\, Walsh School of Foreign Service and Senior Associate\, Center for Strategic & International Studies Africa Program \nMr. Travis L. Adkins is a lecturer of African and security studies at the Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. As an international development leader\, he has two decades of experience working in governance\, civil society\, and refugee and migration affairs in over 50 nations throughout Africa and the Middle East. This includes serving as staff director of the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Africa\, working with leading international nongovernmental organizations and think tanks\, as well as within several branches of the UN system. Travis is an alumnus of the International Affairs Fellowship at the Council on Foreign Relations and a recipient of academic appointments from Carnegie Mellon and New York Universities. Mr. Adkins has served in numerous international election observation missions in Africa and the Middle East with the National Democratic Institute; is a contributor to Foreign Policy\, The Grio\, the BBC\, and Al Jazeera on African affairs; and is the creator and host of the On Africa podcast\, which engages diverse thought leaders in conversation on the continent’s politics\, history\, and culture. \nAdmiral Michelle Howard\nFormer Commander of United States Naval Forces Europe\, Commander of United States Naval Forces Africa\, and Vice Chief of Naval Operations \nAdmiral Michelle J. Howard\, a former United States Navy officer\, was the first woman to become a four-star Admiral in the U.S. Navy and the first woman to be appointed to the position of Vice Chief of Naval Operations (number two in a Military Service). She was also the first African American woman to command a ship in the U.S. Navy\, and the first to reach the rank of three-star and four-stars in the Armed Forces. During her long career as the Commander of a ship\, an Expeditionary Strike Group; Task Force; and a Naval theater\, she led Sailors and Marines\, most recently as U.S. Naval Forces Europe and U.S. Naval Forces Africa. She simultaneously led NATO’s Allied Joint Force Command Naples with oversight of missions from the Western Balkans to Iraq. Additional operations in her career include: NATO peacekeeping\, West African Training Cruise\, Indonesia Tsunami Relief operations\, and the rescue of Maersk Alabama from Somali Pirates. Admiral Howard is a Desert Storm and Operation Iraqi Freedom veteran. She also served as the J.B. and Maurice C. Shapiro Visiting Professor of International Affairs at George Washington University\, where she taught in the areas of cybersecurity and international policy. \nAmbassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield\nSenior Vice President\, Albright Stonebridge Group; Former Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs and Director General of the Foreign Service and Director of Human Resources\, Department of State \nAmbassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield is currently a Senior Vice President at Albright Stonebridge Group leading the firm’s Africa practice\, after having served a long and distinguished 35-year foreign service career. From 2013 to 2017\, Ambassador Thomas-Greenfield served as U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs\, where she led the development and management of U.S. policy toward sub-Saharan Africa\, with a focus on economic empowerment\, investment opportunities\, peace and security\, and democracy and governance. Prior to that appointment\, she served as Director General of the Foreign Service and Director of Human Resources\, leading the team in charge of the State Department’s 70\,000 personnel. Her foreign service career also included an ambassadorship to Liberia from 2008 to 2012\, and postings at the U.S. Mission to the United Nations in Switzerland\, as well as in Kenya\, Nigeria\, The Gambia\, Pakistan\, and Jamaica. In Washington\, she served as Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of the State Department’s Bureau of African Affairs\, and as Deputy Assistant Secretary in the Bureau of Population\, Refugees and Migration. Prior to joining the U.S. Department of State\, Ambassador Thomas-Greenfield taught political science at Bucknell University in Pennsylvania. She is also a Distinguished Resident Fellow in African Affairs at the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy at Georgetown University Walsh School of Foreign Service. \nAmbassador Melanne Verveer (Moderator)\nExecutive Director\, Georgetown Institute for Women\, Peace and Security; Special Representative on Gender Issues\, OSCE Chairmanship \nAmb. Verveer previously served as the first U.S. Ambassador for Global Women’s Issues\, a position to which she was nominated by President Obama in 2009. She coordinated foreign policy issues and activities relating to the political\, economic and social advancement of women\, traveling to nearly sixty countries. She worked to ensure that women’s participation and rights are fully integrated into U.S. foreign policy\, and she played a leadership role in the Administration’s development of the U.S. National Action Plan on Women\, Peace and Security. President Obama also appointed her to serve as the U.S. Representative to the UN Commission on the Status of Women. \nFrom 2000-2008\, she was the Chair and Co-CEO of Vital Voices Global Partnership\, an international NGO that she co-founded to invest in emerging women leaders. During the Clinton administration\, she served as Assistant to the President and Chief of Staff to the First Lady. She also led the effort to establish the President’s Interagency Council on Women\, and was instrumental in the adoption of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000. She is the co-author of Fast Forward: How Women Can Achieve Power and Purpose (2015). URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/diversity-and-inclusion-a-national-security-imperative/ LOCATION:Zoom\, Zoom\, US CATEGORIES:Academic Events,Racial Justice,Special Events ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://www.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/DI-1.jpg ORGANIZER;CN="Center%20for%20Security%20Studies":MAILTO:securitystudies@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200929T120000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200929T130000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200921T073858Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200921T195135Z UID:41561-1601380800-1601384400@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:MDI Lightning Talks: Natural Language Processing DESCRIPTION:The Massive Data Institute at the \n\nMcCourt School of Public Policy \n\n\ninvites you to a series of Lightning Talks on\nNatural Language Processing at Georgetown\n\nTuesday\, September 29th\n12 p.m.\nRSVP here \n\nNatural language processing is a rapidly growing area across many academic disciplines.  In order to help build the NLP community at Georgetown\, the Massive Data Institute is sponsoring and bringing together researchers working in this area from a variety of disciplines and schools.   After hearing from these scholars via brief “lightning talks” we will have a general discussion on opportunities and challenges in this field at Georgetown and beyond. This is the first of several events sponsored by MDI in which we seek to build the data science community at Georgetown.   Future events will cover topics such as spatial data and machine learning.\n\nfeaturing\n\nMichael Bailey\, Director of MDI and Professor of Government and Policy\nLisa Singh\, MDI Research Professor and Professor of Computer Science\nXiaofei Zhao\, Associate Professor of Finance at McDonough School of Business\nShareen Joshi\, Associate Professor at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service\nJaren Haber\, MDI Postdoctoral Fellow\nAmir Zeldes\, Associate Professor of Computational Linguistics\nErik Voeten\, Peter F. Krogh Professor of Geopolitics and Justice in World Affairs at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/mdinlp/ LOCATION:Online: Zoom\, Online: Zoom\, US CATEGORIES:Academic Events,Research ORGANIZER;CN="Massive%20Data%20Institute":MAILTO:jonathan.beam@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200929T151500 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200929T163000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200903T153851Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200918T191222Z UID:38419-1601392500-1601397000@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Physics Colloquium: Facilitating thinking and learning in and beyond the physics classrooms DESCRIPTION:Prof. Chandralekha Singh\, University of Pittsburgh \nAbstract: I will discuss\, using my research in physics education\, how research can be used as a guide to develop curricula and pedagogies to reduce student difficulties. My research has focused on improving student understanding of introductory and advanced concepts\, for example\, in learning quantum mechanics.  We are developing research-based learning tools such as tutorials and peer instruction tools that actively engage students in the learning process.  I will discuss how we evaluate their effectiveness using a variety of methodologies. I will also discuss our research studies that provide guidelines for how to enhance physics by making it inclusive. \n  \nPlease contact Department for Meeting Link URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/physics-colloquium-prof-chandralekha-singh-university-of-pittsburgh/ LOCATION:Virtual event held over Zoom\, Virtual event held over Zoom\, US CATEGORIES:Academic Events END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200929T170000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200929T180000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200914T183320Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200915T212230Z UID:39817-1601398800-1601402400@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:My Father’s Journey from Hasidic WWI Warsaw and My Quest to Follow DESCRIPTION:From Eventbrite: \nAbout the Book: \nDr. Deborah Tannen’s father was raised in a Hasidic household in Warsaw. In 1920\, He came to the United States at the age of twelve\, already identifying as a communist\, atheist and Zionist. Ultimately\, her father became disillusioned with communism but remained a devout atheist. His support for Israel grew ever stronger. When Dr. Tannen asked him if he felt more Polish or American\, he responded\, “I feel like a Jew.” His Jewish identity underlies and pervades every aspect of his life story\, which doubles as a walking tour through history. This “tour” demonstrates how WWI and the Bolshevik revolution transformed the Jewish community of Warsaw; the massive influx of East European Jews to America; New York’s garment district; and the Great Depression. The more personal aspects of this tour reveal how a boy could quit high school at fourteen to support his mother and sister by working in a factory\, yet go on to establish his own law firm and run for congress (holding a vast array of jobs\, including prison guard and gun-toting alcohol tax inspector\, along the way). \nDr. Tannen initially conceived the book a study of her father’s life. However\, after she pored over the many journals\, documents\, and letters he left her\, as well as the transcripts and notes from the countless hours she spent talking to him about his past\, the book evolved to reflect the many ways that he shaped her own life. Thus\, her latest work additionally focuses on their contrasting perceptions of their Jewish identities and\, inextricably\, their experiences with anti-Semitism. \nAbout the Author: \nDr. Deborah Tannen has written seventeen academic books\, over one hundred scholarly articles\, and eight books for general audiences. The best known of these is You Just Don’t Understand: Women and Men in Conversation\, which was on the New York Times best seller list for nearly four years. This is the book that brought gender differences in communication style to the forefront of public awareness. Her books Talking from 9 to 5: Women and Men at Work\, You Were Always Mom’s Favorite!: Sisters in Conversation Throughout Their Lives and You’re Wearing THAT?: Understanding Mothers and Daughters in Conversation were also New York Times best sellers. \nThis event will be recorded. By joining this event you consent to Georgetown University using video and photos of you taken during the event in its social media and promotional materials. For all other accommodation requests\, please email bhm29@georgetown.edu by September 21. A good-faith effort will be made to fulfill requests after September 21. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/my-fathers-journey-from-hasidic-wwi-warsaw-and-my-quest-to-follow/ LOCATION:Online\, Online\, US END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200929T170000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200929T181500 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200915T135957Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200918T191222Z UID:39935-1601398800-1601403300@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:"Agitate!"--Frederick Douglass and Ireland DESCRIPTION:Global Irish Studies at Georgetown University\, in conjunction with Georgetown’s History Department\, the African American Irish Diaspora Network\, University College Cork\, Irish Network-DC\, Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute at Quinnipiac University\, Glucksman Ireland House of New York University\, New York University in DC\, and the Embassy of Ireland USA\, presents \n  \n“Agitate!”–Frederick Douglass and Ireland: A conversation about history\, solidarity\, and racial justice in Ireland and the US \nTuesday\, September 29\, 5:00 pm – 6:15 pm EDT. This will be on online webinar\, hosted on the Zoom platform \n  \nThe conversation will be moderated by Prof. Miriam Nyhan Grey\, Associate Director of Glucksman Ireland House at New York University\, and introduced by Ambassador of Ireland to the US\, Dan Mulhall. It will feature: \nProf. Edna Greene Medford (Howard University)–a historian of emancipation in the US\, and a recipient of the Order of Lincoln prize. Her books include Lincoln and Emancipation (2015)\, as well as The Emancipation Proclamation: Three Views. She compiled and wrote the introductions to the edited two-volume work The Price of Freedom: Slavery and the Civil War – Volume I\, and The Price of Freedom: Slavery and the Civil War – Volume II. \nProf. Christine Kinealy (Quinnipiac University)–an award-winning specialist in nineteenth-century Irish and Irish-American history\, founder of Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute at Quinnipiac\, and most recently author of Black Abolitionists in Ireland\, as well as editor of Frederick Douglass in Ireland: in his own words. \nProf. Maurice Jackson (Georgetown University)–a renowned expert in African American and Atlantic history\, and also in the history and culture of African Americans\, especially the history of Jazz. He is the author of Let This Voice Be Heard: Anthony Benezet\, Father of Atlantic Abolitionism\, co-editor with Jackie Bacon of African-Americans and the Haitian Revolution and co-editor with Susan Kozel of Quakers and their Allies in the Abolitionist Cause\, 1754-1808. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/agitate-frederick-douglass-and-ireland/ LOCATION:Virtual Event. RSVP for link to Webinar\, Virtual Event. RSVP for link to Webinar\, US CATEGORIES:Academic Events ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://www.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/27374065584_7c2490d732_b.jpg ORGANIZER;CN="C%C3%B3il%C3%ADn%20Parsons":MAILTO:coilin.parsons@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200930T120000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200930T133000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200831T153933Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200831T153933Z UID:37733-1601467200-1601472600@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:The Importance of Data in Patent Applications – From Filing Complete Provisional Applications to Addressing Rejections at the USPTO DESCRIPTION:Experimental data is a crucial tool for obtaining the best patent coverage for inventions coming out of university laboratories. This talk will focus on the importance of providing data in a provisional application in order to establish a strong priority date for your invention and how data can be used to overcome examiner rejections during the process of obtaining a patent. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/the-importance-of-data-in-patent-applications-from-filing-complete-provisional-applications-to-addressing-rejections-at-the-uspto/ LOCATION:This will be a Zoom Conference. Please use the Eventbrite link below to register for the event. You will then receive a Zoom link soon after.\, This will be a Zoom Conference. Please use the Eventbrite link below to register for the event. You will then receive a Zoom link soon after.\, US ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/png:https://www.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/OTC-Logo-v.1.png ORGANIZER;CN="Jeremy%20Scott%20Alexander":MAILTO:jsa28@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200930T120000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200930T130000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200918T141601Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200921T172350Z UID:40572-1601467200-1601470800@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:“Such a Time As This”: Racial Justice and the University DESCRIPTION:This series of conversations will explore how Georgetown faculty’s research advances racial justice. The sessions will consider how racial justice produces certain responsibilities for researchers. We will also examine how the pursuit of justice informs the impact of the speakers’ work. We will not only focus on the  work of individual faculty members but also how the mission of Georgetown University informs and supports this work.   \nThese conversations have been scheduled from 12:00-1:00pm on Wednesdays throughout the month of October\, starting on Wednesday\, September 30\, 2020 and concluding on Wednesday\, October 28\, 2020. Please see each date for the zoom link.  \n  \nSchedule of Webinars:\n  \nSeptember 30\, Week 1: “Defining Our Terms: Ethical Vision\, Moral Mandate” \nCo-sponsored by the School of Foreign Service  \n\nModerator: Scott Taylor\, Director of the African Studies Program and Vice Dean for Diversity\, Equity and Inclusion in the School of Foreign Service\nTerrence Johnson\, Associate Professor of religion and politics in the Department of Government\nGwendolyn Mikell\, Chair of the Department of Anthropology and professor in the School of Foreign Service\n\n  \nOctober 7\, Week 2: “Racial Justice and the Arts”  \n\nModerator: Soyica Colbert\, Vice Dean of Faculty\, Director of Arts Initiatives and professor of African American Studies and Performing Arts\nNatsu Onoda Power\, professor in the Department of Performing Arts\nCarlos Simon\, assistant professor in the Department of Performing Arts\n\n  \nOctober 14\, Week 3: “Intersectionality\, Women Acting-Up” \nCo-sponsored by the the Gender+Justice Initiative \n\nModerator: Denise Brennan\, Chair of the Department of Anthropology\, Co-Founder and Co-Director of the Gender+ Justice Initiative\nMireya Loza\, professor in the Department of History and the Department of American Studies\nJamil Scott\, professor in the Department of Government\nRegine Jean-Charles\, professor of French at Boston College\n\n  \nOctober 21\, Week 4: “Racial Justice\, Science\, and Health” \n\nModerator: Peter Marra\, professor and Director of the Georgetown Environment Initiative\nLakshmi Krishnan\, professor of Medicine\, affiliate faculty in the Department of English\, affiliated faculty in the Georgetown Humanities Initiative\nSheila Foster\, Scott K. Ginsburg Professor of Urban Law and Policy at Georgetown\, joint appointment with the Georgetown Law School and the McCourt Public Policy School.\n\n  \nOctober 28\, Week 5: “Spatial Politics: Prisons\, Cities\, and Borders” \n\nModerator: Becky Hsu\, professor in the Department of Sociology\nJennifer Boum Make\, professor in the Department of French and Francophone Studies\nMike Amezcua\, professor in the Department of History URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/such-a-time-as-this-racial-justice-and-the-university/2020-09-30/ LOCATION:Remote Online CATEGORIES:Racial Justice,Social Justice,Student Events ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://www.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/such-a-time-as-this-solo.jpg END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20200930T130000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20200930T143000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200911T183543Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200918T191222Z UID:40843-1601470800-1601476200@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Russian Conversation Hours DESCRIPTION:Russian conversation hour for those learning the language. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/russian-conversation-hours-2/2020-09-30/ LOCATION:RSVP to receive a link to Zoom meeting – russconversations@georgetown.edu\, RSVP to receive a link to Zoom meeting - russconversations@georgetown.edu\, US ORGANIZER;CN="Marina%20Samkharadze":MAILTO:ms2395@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20201001T120000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20201001T130000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200819T144514Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200921T194742Z UID:36710-1601553600-1601557200@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:GPEP-R: Race and Trade Politics DESCRIPTION:The Global Political Economy Project (GPEP) team presents a series of talks\, GPEP-R\, which will focus on race in International Political Economy. The talks will be hosted on Zoom and will consist of a 20-minute presentation highlighting the speaker’s research and mapping a future research agenda\, followed by Q&A and a broader conversation on the topic. Talks will stream live on Thursdays from 12-1pm ET and recorded versions will be available on the GPEP website. \nIn this discussion\, Dr. Alexandra Guisinger of Temple University will explore the intersections of race and trade politics. \nClick here to register for this event. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/gpep-r-race-and-trade-politics/ LOCATION:Online\, Online\, US CATEGORIES:Academic Events ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://www.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/featured-attempt-PDF.jpg END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20201001T140000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20201001T160000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200907T163945Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200921T173452Z UID:40827-1601560800-1601568000@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Decolonizing Global Health Seminar Series DESCRIPTION:Please join the Science\, Technology and International Affairs Program (STIA) and the Center for Global Health Science and Security (GHSS) for a new seminar series on Decolonizing Global Health. This series is offered in conjunction with a new 1-credit course in the STIA program\, STIA 408\, led by Professors Claire Standley and Emily Mendenhall. The talks take place on select Thursdays at 2pm and are open to the Georgetown community. \nThe concept of “decolonialization” of academic curricula and research partnerships has gained momentum in recent years\, stemming from frustrations at the implicit and explicit ways in which Western cultural\, political\, and educational hegemony pervade virtually all disciplines. In global health\, false narratives of objectivity\, universality\, and apolitical interests cloud the realities of historical roots in European and North American colonial endeavors. \nWant to learn more? Georgetown students can RSVP here to join the Zoom room for individual lectures – please see the links below. Those students who succesfully RSVP for the event will receive a google calendar invite with the Zoom meeting link. \nNot a Georgetown student? You can watch the sessions streamed live over YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/c/DecolonizingGlobalHealth and submit questions in the comments! \n**Please note that registration for any of the individual seminars indicates your consent to have your video and audio live streamed to the “Decolonizing Global Health” YouTube channel\, as well as recorded for later public posting. \n  \nSeminar Schedule \nAugust 26 – Global Health Research Needs a Makeover \nProfessor Madhukar Pai\, Canada Research Chair in Epidemiology & Global Health\, McGill University & Director\, McGill International TB Centre \n  \nSeptember 7* – The Colonial Legacy: Re-thinking Health Equity in the Global South \nDr. Maria Amelia Viteri (University of Maryland\, USA & Universidad San Francisco de Quito\, Ecuador) \n*Note that this session occurs on a Monday \n  \nSeptember 17 – Global health\, Development\, and Colonialism \nDr. Lucy Gilson (University of Cape Town\, South Africa) and Dr. Mosa Moshabela (University of KwaZulu-Natal\, South Africa) \n  \nSeptember 24 – Indigenous knowledge in public health \nDr. Eli Nelson (Williams College\, USA) \nAssistant Professor\, American Studies and Science and Technology Studies Programs \nMedicine has an especially capacious definition in Indigenous contexts\, touching on topics and relationships in the realms of religion\, governance\, diplomacy\, environmental sciences\, and more. Indigenous doctors and public health authorities have long argued that decolonizing or reforming public health requires a holistic approach that can be incommensurable with settler and other colonial modes of risk assessment\, care\, and future planning. In this lecture\, I will provide a broad historical and contemporary view of Indigenous medicine and public health on Turtle Island\, focusing on the roles it has played in Indigenous assertions of sovereignty\, land\, spirit\, and futurity. We will start with a review of how Indigenous medicine and knowledge was deployed in epidemics in the 17th century\, followed by reservation medicine during the Red Progressive era\, Indigenous feminist public health movements in the 20th century\, and concluding with a note on how Native science and medicine produces community care and protection amidst climate change and Covid-19 crises. \n  \nOctober 1 – Health equity and reform (Time TBD) \nDr. Devaki Nambiar (The George Institute for Global Health\, India) \n  \nOctober 8 – Increasing research equity and autonomy \nDr. Ngozi Erondu (Chatham House\, UK & Project Zambezi\, Zimbabwe) \n  \nOctober 15 – Effecting change in academia / Colonial legacies in mental health \nDr. Anouska Bhattacharyya (YW Boston\, USA) \n  \nWeek of October 19: Capstone Panel (Date/Time TBD) \nDr. Akiiki Bitalabeho\, Dr. Zahirah McNatt (University of Global Health Equity\, Rwanda & Partners in Health | Inshuti Mu Buzima\, Rwanda) URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/decolonizing-global-health-seminar-series/2020-10-01/ LOCATION:Remote Online\, Remote Online\, US CATEGORIES:Academic Events ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://www.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/https-_cdn.evbuc_.com_images_110414363_110057598857_1_original.20200903-201623-e1599496376995.jpg ORGANIZER;CN="Obdulio%20Moronta":MAILTO:om111@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20201001T153000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20201001T163000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200820T182440Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200825T140930Z UID:36879-1601566200-1601569800@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Inclusive Coalitions for an Arctic in Motion: Migration in Harmony Research Coordination Network DESCRIPTION:Urbanization\, globalization\, and the impacts of climate change are activating the simultaneous migrations of species\, ecosystems\, settlements\, and cultures across Arctic coastlines in new and unpredictable ways. Arctic port cities are witnessing increased maritime traffic and inflow of migrant labor; rural villages are facing displacement from slow and sudden-onset disasters; sea ice melt and ocean warming are shifting marine species ranges; and terrestrial ecosystems in transition are upending Arctic food webs and introducing southern disease vectors. Each of these intersecting mobilities pose environmental justice issues for quality of life and environmental health of the circumpolar north. A lack of integration across siloed research communities has hampered the expansion of knowledge to understand these interactions and provide decision makers and stakeholders with the necessary qualitative and quantitative data to make science-informed decisions. This virtual event will present the new National Science Foundation funded Arctic Migrations in Harmony Research Coordination Network and create space to discuss environmental justice for an Arctic on the move. Together\, we will discuss what we can do together to facilitate open communication\, foster cross-disciplinary coalitions\, and build a research community based on equity\, justice\, and inclusivity of traditional knowledge holders\, natural scientists\, engineers\, students\, humanities scholars\, economists\, social scientists\, storytellers\, engineers\, health professionals\, cultural heritage practitioners\, and educators.\nThis session is in collaboration with Migration In Harmony\, an international\, cross-disciplinary network of Arctic migration researchers funded by the National Science Foundation. Learn more and sign up at https://mailchi.mp/georgetown/migrationinharmony. \nBio: Victoria Herrmann\, PhD is an Assistant Research Professor at Georgetown University\, a National Geographic Explorer\, and the Managing Director of The Arctic Institute. She currently serves as the Principle Investigator of the Arctic Migration in Harmony Research Coordination Network. Previously\, she led the America’s Eroding Edges project\, wherein she interviewed 350 local leaders to identify what’s needed most to safeguard coastal communities against the unavoidable impacts of climate change. Her current project\, Rise Up to Rising Tides\, is creating an online matchmaking platform that connects pro bono assistance in adaptation and preservation with climate-affected communities She was previously a Fulbright Awardee to Canada\, a Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the National Academies of Sciences\, and a Gates Scholar at the University of Cambridge\, where she received her PhD in Geography. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/inclusive-coalitions-for-an-arctic-in-motion-migration-in-harmony-research-coordination-network/ LOCATION:Online (Zoom)\, Online (Zoom)\, US ORGANIZER;CN="Institute%20for%20the%20Study%20of%20International%20Migration":MAILTO:isim@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/New_York:20201002T120000 DTEND;TZID=America/New_York:20201002T130000 DTSTAMP:20200921T190527 CREATED:20200904T133451Z LAST-MODIFIED:20200918T191223Z UID:38489-1601640000-1601643600@www.georgetown.edu SUMMARY:Psychology Colloquium: Memory representations supporting conceptual knowledge DESCRIPTION:Speaker \nDr. Dagmar (Dasa) Zeithamova\, University of Oregon \nTitle \nMemory representations supporting conceptual knowledge \nAbstract \nTBA \nFaculty Host \nDr. Chandan Vaidya \nPlease RSVP to receive Zoom link. URL:https://www.georgetown.edu/event/psychology-colloquium-memory-representations-supporting-conceptual-knowledge/ LOCATION:Virtual via Zoom\, Virtual via Zoom\, US CATEGORIES:Research ORGANIZER;CN="Department%20of%20Psychology":MAILTO:psychology@georgetown.edu END:VEVENT END:VCALENDAR